Giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens) is the largest of more than 20 species in the genus Dipodomys, which is in the family Heteromyidae. This family includes kangaroo rats, kangaroo mice and pocket mice. They are not really rats at all. At least, they are not like common nonnative household rats, which are in the Muridae family.

  • States/US Territories in which the Giant kangaroo rat, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  California
  • US Counties in which the Giant kangaroo rat, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
1987-01-05 California/Nevada Region (Region 8) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
2006-03-22 00:00:00.0 71 FR 14538 14542 Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 56 Species in California and Nevada: Notice of review.
1987-01-05 00:00:00.0 52 FR 283 288 Determination of Endangered Status for Giant Kangaroo Rat; 52 FR 283-288
1985-08-13 00:00:00.0 50 FR 32585 32587 Proposed End. Status for Giant Kangaroo Rat; 50 FR 32585-32587
1982-12-30 00:00:00.0 47 FR 58454 58460 Review of Vertebrate Wildlife for Listing as End. or Thr. Species
2010-05-21 00:00:00.0 75 FR 28636 28642 Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 34 Species in California and Nevada; Availability of 96 Completed 5-Year Reviews in California and Nevada

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
1998-09-30 Recovery Plan for Upland Species of the San Joaquin Valley, California View Implementation Progress Final
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
2006-03-22 71 FR 14538 14542 Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 56 Species in California and Nevada: Notice of review.
  • Notice 5-year Review
2010-05-21 75 FR 28636 28642 Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 34 Species in California and Nevada; Availability of 96 Completed 5-Year Reviews in California and Nevada
  • Notice 5-year Review, Completion
Five Year Review
Date Title
2010-02-16 Giant kangaroo Rat 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Giant kangaroo rat.

» Conservation Plans

Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) (learn more)
HCP Plan Summaries
ARCO Coles Levvee (ARCO Western Energy)
Chevron Pipeline
EnviroCycle, Inc.
Kern County Waste Facilities
Kern Water Bank
Metropolitan Bakersfield
Nuevo-Torch
PG&E San Joaquin Valley Operations & Maintenance HCP
Seneca and Enron Oil and Gas

» Petitions

» Life History

Food Habits

Giant kangaroo rats are primarily seed eaters, but also eat green plants and insects and inhabit annual grassland communities with few or no shrubs, well drained, sandy-loam soils located on gentle slopes (less than 11 percent) in areas with about 6.3 inches or less of annual precipitation (Grinnell 1932; Shaw 1934; Hawbecker 1951).

Movement / Home Range

Historically colonies of giant kangaroo rats were found from the base of the Tehachapi Mountains in the south; to 10 miles south of Los Banos, Merced County in the north; the Carrizo Plain and San Juan Creek watershed west of the Temblor Range to the west; and the floor of the San Joaquin Valley to the East. This area encompasses an estimated 1,561,017 acres (Grinnell 1932; Shaw 1934; Hawbecker 1944, 1951; Williams 1992). Currently, the population is found on less than 5 percent of this historic range and is fragmented into six major geographic units: (1) the Ciervo-Panoche Region in western Fresno and eastern San Benito Counties; (2) Kettleman Hills in southwestern Kings County; (3) San Juan Creek Valley in eastern San Luis Obispo County; (4) the Lokern area, Elk Hills previously known as the National Petroleum Reserve Number One (NPR-1), that includes Buena Vista and McKittrick Valleys, National Petroleum Reserve Number Two (NPR-2), Taft, and Maricopa in western Kern County; (5) the Carrizo Plain in eastern San Luis Obispo County; and (6) the Cuyama Valley along the eastern Santa Barbara-San Luis Obispo County line (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS] 1998).

Other

When abundant locally, giant kangaroo rats are significant prey items for many species, including the Federal and State listed endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica). In addition, their burrows are used by blunt-nosed leopard lizards (Gambelia sila) (federally and State endangered) and the San Joaquin antelope squirrel (Ammospermophilus nelsoni) (State threatened) (Williams 1992). Caulanthus californicus (California jewelflower) (federally endangered) grows primarily on the burrow systems of the giant kangaroo rat (Cypher 1994).

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.