Lesser Long-Nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae yerbabuenae)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

Leptonycteris curasoae is a yellow-brown or cinnamon gray bat, with a total head and body measurement of approximately 3 inches (7.62 cm). The tongue measures approximately the same length as the body. This species also has a small noseleaf. The wingspan of L. curasoae is approximately 10 inches (25 cm) and the mass is roughly 23 g

  • States/US Territories in which the Lesser Long-Nosed bat, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  Arizona , New Mexico
  • US Counties in which the Lesser Long-Nosed bat, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
  • USFWS Refuges in which the Lesser Long-Nosed bat, Wherever found is known to occur:  Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge
  • Countries in which the the Lesser Long-Nosed bat, Wherever found is known to occur:  Mexico
  • Additional species information
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
1988-09-30 Southwest Region (Region 2) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
2013-09-09 00:00:00.0 78 FR 55046 55051 90-Day Finding on a Petition To Delist or Reclassify From Endangered to Threatened Five Southwest Species
1987-07-06 00:00:00.0 52 FR 25271 25275 Proposed Determination of End. Status for 2 Long-nosed Bats; 52 FR 25271- 25275
2005-02-02 00:00:00.0 70 FR 5460 5463 5-Year Review of Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Black-capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane
1988-09-30 00:00:00.0 53 FR 38456 38460 Determination of End. Status for 2 Long-nosed Bats; 53 FR 38456-38460

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
1997-03-04 Lesser Long-nosed Bat View Implementation Progress Final
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
2005-02-02 70 FR 5460 5463 5-Year Review of Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Black-capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane
  • Notice 5-year Review
Five Year Review
Date Title
2007-08-30 Lesser Long-nosed Bat 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Lesser Long-Nosed bat.

» Conservation Plans

Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) (learn more)
HCP Plan Summaries
Pima County Multi-Species Conservation Plan, under Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

Requires caves and mines for roost sites (maternity, male-only, late-summer, and night roosts are used differently) and access to healthy stands of saguaro cactus and paniculate agaves for foraging. The Sonoran desertscrub vegetation community provides the early summer forage base, with bats found in southwestern Arizona. The semi-desert grassland and oak woodlands provide the late summer agave resources in the southeastern portion of the state

Food Habits

Nectar and pollen from the flowers of the saguaro cactus is the primary food source in the early summer and from the flowers of paniculate agaves in late summer to early fall are the primary food sources. Will use ripe fruits from saguaro and organ pipe cactus.

Movement / Home Range

Bats make considerable seasonal and nightly movements. Migrants from central Mexico arrive in Arizona and adjoining portions of Sonora in April, move from the southwestern part of the state to the southeastern part over the summer, and return to central Mexico by September. Nightly foraging flights may be as much as 30 km from the roost site, and foraging areas are selected based on past and present signs of high resource availability (many cacti or agaves in an area) and utilized over several nights until the pollen and nectar resources are depleted.

Reproductive Strategy

Females arrive already pregnant at maternity roosts in Arizona as early as the second week in April. The single young is born in May. Maternity colonies vary in size, from a few hundred to tens of thousands of females. Males maintain separate colonies during this period.Young bats can fly by the end of June, and the maternity colonies break up by the end of July

Other

Disturbance at occupied roost sites and destruction of roosts during the seasons when bats are not present are significant threats to the species. Large expanses of suitable foraging habitats must be maintained within proximity to roosts to allow for efficient foraging. Fragmentation of foraging habitat, land use changes that eliminate or reduce forage plant populations, or the placement of "barriers" between roosts and foraging areas are also significant and may have adverse effects on the use of roosts in the vicinity.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.