New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (jumping mouse) is endemic to New Mexico, Arizona, and a small area of southern Colorado (Hafner et al. 1981, pp. 501-502; Jones 1999, p. 1). The jumping mouse is grayish-brown on the back, yellowish-brown on the sides, and white underneath (Van Pelt 1993, p 1). The species is about 7. 4 to 10 inches (187 to 255 mm) in total length, with elongated feet (1.2 inches (30.6 mm)) and an extremely long, bicolored tail (5.1 inches (130.6 mm)) (Van Pelt 1993, p. 1; Hafner et al. 1981, p. 509). The jumping mouse is a habitat specialist (Frey 2006d, p. 3). It nests in dry soils, but uses moist, streamside, dense riparian/wetland vegetation up to an elevation of about 8,000 feet (Frey 2006d, pp. 34-45). The jumping mouse appears to only utilize two riparian community types: 1) persistent emergent herbaceous wetlands (i.e., beaked sedge and reed canarygrass alliances); and 2) scrub-shrub wetlands (i.e., riparian areas along perennial streams that are composed of willows and alders) (Frey 2005, p. 53). It especially uses microhabitats of patches or stringers of tall dense sedges on moist soil along the edge of permanent water. Home ranges vary between 0.37 and 2.7 acres (0.15 and 1.1 hectares) and may overlap (Smith 1999, p. 4). The jumping mouse is generally nocturnal, but occasionally diurnal. It is active only during the growing season of the grasses and forbs on which it depends. During the growing season, the jumping mouse accumulates fat reserves by consuming seeds. Preparation for hibernation (weight gain, nest building) seems to be triggered by day length. The jumping mouse hibernates about 9 months out of the year, longer than most other mammals (Morrison 1990, p. 141; VanPelt 1993, p. 1; Frey 2005a, p. 59).

  • States/US Territories in which the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse, is known to or is believed to occur:  Arizona , Colorado , New Mexico
  • US Counties in which the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse, is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
  • USFWS Refuges in which the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse, is known to occur:  Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
  • Additional species information
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
07/10/2014 Southwest Region (Region 2)

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
06/20/2013 78 FR 37327 37363 Proposed Designation of Critical Habitat for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse
12/06/2007 72 FR 69034 69106 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule
03/16/2016 81 FR 14263 14325 Designation of Critical Habitat for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse; Final Rule
12/10/2008 73 FR 75176 75244 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule
01/06/1989 54 FR 554 579 ETWP; Animal Notice of Review; 54 FR 554 579
11/15/1994 59 FR 58982 59028 ETWP; Animal Candidate Review for Listing as Endangered or Threatened Species.
11/21/2012 77 FR 69993 70060 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
06/20/2013 78 FR 37363 37369 Listing Determination for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse
11/10/2010 75 FR 69222 69294 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule
10/26/2011 76 FR 66370 66439 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
04/08/2014 79 FR 19307 19313 Designation of Critical Habitat for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse
11/21/1991 56 FR 58804 58836 ETWP; Animal Candidate Review for Listing as Endangered or Threatened Species; 56 FR 58804 58836
11/09/2009 74 FR 57804 57878 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
06/10/2014 79 FR 33119 33137 Determination of Endangered Status for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse Throughout Its Range
09/18/1985 50 FR 37958 37967 Review of Vertebrate Wildlife; Notice of Review; 50 FR 37958-37967

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
06/09/2014 Recovery Outline: New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) View Implementation Progress Outline

» Critical Habitat

Date Citation Page Title Document Type Status
03/16/2016 81 FR 14263 14325 Designation of Critical Habitat for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse; Final Rule Final Rule Final designated
06/20/2013 78 FR 37327 37363 Proposed Designation of Critical Habitat for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse Proposed Rule Not Required

To learn more about critical habitat please see http://ecos.fws.gov/crithab

» Conservation Plans

No conservation plans have been created for New Mexico meadow jumping mouse.

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

1. Riparian communities along rivers and streams, springs and wetlands, or canals and ditches that contain: 2. persistent emergent herbaceous wetlands especially characterized by presence of primarily forbs and sedges (Carex spp. or Schoenoplectus pungens); or 3. Scrub-shrub riparian areas that are composed of willows (Salix spp.) or alders (Alnus spp.) with an understory of primarily forbs and sedges; and 4. Flowing water that provides saturated soils throughout the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse’s active season that supports: 5. Tall (average stubble height of herbaceous vegetation of at least 61 cm (24 inches) and dense herbaceous riparian vegetation composed primarily of sedges (Carex spp. or Schoenoplectus pungens) and forbs, including, but not limited to one or more of the following associated species: spikerush (Eleocharis macrostachya), beaked sedge (Carex rostrata), rushes (Juncus spp. and Scirpus spp.), and numerous species of grasses such as bluegrass (Poa spp.), slender wheatgrass (Elymus trachycaulus), brome (Bromus spp.), foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum), or Japanese brome (Bromus japonicas), and forbs such as water hemlock (Circuta douglasii), field mint (Mentha arvense), asters (Aster spp.), or cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata); and 6. Sufficient areas of 9 to 24 km (5.6 to 15 mi) along a stream, ditch, or canal that contains suitable or restorable habitat to support movements of individual New Mexico meadow jumping mice; and 7. Include adjacent floodplain and upland areas extending approximately 100 m (330 ft) outward from the boundary between the active water channel and the floodplain (as defined by the bankfull stage of streams) or from the top edge of the ditch or canal.

Food Habits

Upon emerging from hibernation, diets of individual jumping mice (Zapus spp.) are primarily insects (e.g., lepidopteran larvae and beetles), along with grass seeds (Trainor et al. 2012, p. 435; Frey and Wright, 2012, pp. 28, 39). Diets shift from animals to a variety of seeds as the active season progresses (Trainor et al. 2012, p. 435; Frey 2013e, p. 9). Based on studies of other species, jumping mice (Zapus spp.) diets are varied, consisting of seeds, insects, fruits, and fungi (Quimby 1951, pp. 85–86; Hoffmeister 1986, p. 455; Morrison 1990, p. 141). Morrison (1990, p. 141) reported that jumping mice feed primarily on seeds of grasses and forbs, with seeds of sedges, bulrush (Scirpus spp.), and cattail (Typha latifolia) infrequently eaten. Frey and Wright (2010, p. 20; 2012, p. 28; Wright and Frey 2014, entire) observed radio-collared jumping mice on Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), adjacent to the middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, feeding on the ground and in the herbaceous “canopy” 0.5 to 1 m (1.6 to 3.3 ft) or more above the ground eating common threesquare (Schoenoplectus pungens), saltgrass (Distichlis spicata), spikerush (Eleocharis macrostachya), foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum), Saunder’s wildrye (Elymus saundersii), Japanese brome (Bromus japonicas), slender wheatgrass (Elymus trachycaulus), and knotgrass (Paspalum distichum)

Movement / Home Range

New Mexico meadow jumping mice are generally believed to have limited vagility (ability to move) and possibly dispersal capabilities (Morrison 1988, p. 13; Frey and Wright 2012, pp. 43, 109). For example, on Bosque del Apache NWR, the subspecies exhibited extreme site fidelity for daily activities (i.e., movements to and from day nesting and feeding areas) (Frey and Wright 2012, p. 24). Frey and Wright (2012, pp. 12, 15) reported that the typical maximum distance travelled between successive telemetry locations by jumping mice on Bosque del Apache NWR was 300 m (984 ft). In addition, most daily movements based on 95 percent of maximum straight-line distances traveled between time-independent radio telemetry locations (i.e., sufficient time has elapsed to allow the animals to redistribute throughout the home range) were 192 m (630 ft) or less. Moreover, the maximum distance travelled between two successive points by all radio collared New Mexico meadow jumping mice on Bosque del Apache NWR was 744 m (2,441 ft), but most regular daily and seasonal movements were less than 100 m (328 ft) (Frey and Wright 2012, pp. 16, 109; Figure 9). One New Mexico meadow jumping mouse also moved up 1 km (3,280 ft) between years (Frey and Wright 2012, p. 33, 95-96); however, it is unclear how frequently jumping mice are undergoing these long-distance (> 1 km (0.6 mi)) movements. , Frey and Wright (2012, pp. 23, 54) fitted 20 jumping mice on Bosque del Apache NWR with radio collars to evaluate habitat selection. The estimated home range size averaged 1.37 ha (3.4 ac) (range = 0.2 to 4.15 ha (0.5 to 10.25 ac)). Typically, male home ranges (average = 1.77 ha (4.37 ac)) were larger than those of females (0.88 ha (2.17 ac)) (Frey and Wright 2012, p. 23). Beyond these data, very little is known about specific movements of the New Mexico meadow jumping mice.

Reproductive Strategy

Although little is known about the reproductive needs of the jumping mouse, the breeding season probably begins in July or August, with one litter produced each year (Morrison 1987, pp. 14–15; 1989, 22; Frey 2011, p. 69; 2012b, p. 5). Jumping mice (Zapus spp.) breed shortly after emerging from hibernation and may give birth to 2 to 7 young after an average 17 to 21 day gestation (Quimby 1951, p. 63; Frey 2011, p. 69). Young are fully developed and weaned at 4 weeks after birth (Morrison 1987, p. 16; Van Pelt 1993, p. 8). Females will use maternal nests (described below) in areas outside the moist riparian areas for giving birth and rearing young. Tall, dense riparian herbaceous vegetation provides the jumping mouse with a sheltered and hospitable environment, with adequate food resources that enables the mouse to successfully raise its young. The female provides all the care for their young until they are weaned and independent. It is unlikely that juveniles breed during the same year they are born (Morrison 1988, p. 9).

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.