Northern long-eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The northern long-eared bat is a medium-sized bat about 3 to 3.7 inches in length but with a wingspan of 9 to 10 inches. As its name suggests, this bat is distinguished by its long ears, particularly as compared to other bats in its genus, Myotis, which are actually bats noted for their small ears (Myotis means mouse-eared). The northern long-eared bat is found across much of the eastern and north central United States and all Canadian provinces from the Atlantic coast west to the southern Northwest Territories and eastern British Columbia. The speciesí range includes 37 states. White-nose syndrome, a fungal disease known to affect bats, is currently the predominant threat to this bat, especially throughout the Northeast where the species has declined by up to 99 percent from pre-white-nose syndrome levels at many hibernation sites. Although the disease has not yet spread throughout the northern long-eared batís entire range (white-nose syndrome is currently found in at least 25 of 37 states where the northern long-eared bat occurs), it continues to spread. Experts expect that where it spreads, it will have the same impact as seen in the Northeast.

 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
2015-05-04 Great Lakes-Big Rivers Region (Region 3) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
2016-01-14 00:00:00.0 81 FR 1900 1922 4(d) Rule for the Northern Long-Eared Bat; Final rule
2013-12-02 00:00:00.0 78 FR 72058 72059 Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat as an Endangered Species
2015-04-02 00:00:00.0 80 FR 17973 18033 Threatened Species Status for the Northern Long-Eared Bat With 4(d) Rule
2014-11-18 00:00:00.0 79 FR 68657 68659 Endangered Species Status for the Northern Long-Eared Bat: Reopening of comment period
2015-01-16 00:00:00.0 80 FR 2371 2378 Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat With a Rule Under Section 4(d) of the Act
2011-06-29 00:00:00.0 76 FR 38095 38106 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Eastern Small-Footed Bat and the Northern Long-Eared Bat as Threatened or Endangered
2015-01-30 00:00:00.0 80 FR 5079 Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat With a Rule Under Section 4(d) of the Act; Correction
2016-04-27 00:00:00.0 81 FR 24707 24714 Determination That Designation of Critical Habitat Is Not Prudent for the Northern Long-Eared Bat: Critical habitat determination.
2013-10-02 00:00:00.0 78 FR 61045 61080 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Eastern Small-Footed Bat and the Northern Long-Eared Bat as Endangered or Threatened Species; Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat as an Endangered Species; Proposed Rule
2014-06-30 00:00:00.0 79 FR 36698 36699 6-Month Extension of Final Determination on the Proposed Endangered Status for the Northern Long-Eared Bat
Special Rule Publications
Date Citation Page Title
2016-01-14 00:00:00.0 81 FR 1900 1922 4(d) Rule for the Northern Long-Eared Bat; Final rule
2015-04-02 00:00:00.0 80 FR 17973 18033 Threatened Species Status for the Northern Long-Eared Bat With 4(d) Rule
2015-01-16 00:00:00.0 80 FR 2371 2378 Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat With a Rule Under Section 4(d) of the Act

» Recovery

No recovery information is available for the Northern long-eared Bat.

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Northern long-eared Bat.

» Conservation Plans

Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) (learn more)
HCP Plan Summaries
Pioneer Trail Wind Farm E.ON
Wildcat Wind Farm

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

During summer, northern long-eared bats roost singly or in colonies underneath bark, in cavities, or in crevices of both live and dead trees. Males and non-reproductive females may also roost in cooler places, like caves and mines. This bat seems opportunistic in selecting roosts, using tree species based on suitability to retain bark or provide cavities or crevices. It has also been found, rarely, roosting in structures like barns and sheds. Northern long-eared bats spend winter hibernating in caves and mines, called hibernacula. They typically use large caves or mines with large passages and entrances; constant temperatures; and high humidity with no air currents. Specific areas where they hibernate have very high humidity, so much so that droplets of water are often seen on their fur. Within hibernacula, surveyors find them in small crevices or cracks, often with only the nose and ears visible.

Food Habits

Northern long-eared bats emerge at dusk to fly through the understory of forested hillsides and ridges feeding on moths, flies, leafhoppers, caddisflies, and beetles, which they catch while in flight using echolocation. This bat also feeds by gleaning motionless insects from vegetation and water surfaces.

Reproductive Strategy

Breeding begins in late summer or early fall when males begin swarming near hibernacula. After copulation, females store sperm during hibernation until spring, when they emerge from their hibernacula, ovulate, and the stored sperm fertilizes an egg. This strategy is called delayed fertilization. After fertilization, pregnant females migrate to summer areas where they roost in small colonies and give birth to a single pup. Maternity colonies, with young, generally have 30 to 60 bats, although larger maternity colonies have been observed. Most females within a maternity colony give birth around the same time, which may occur from late May or early June to late July, depending where the colony is located within the speciesí range. Young bats start flying by 18 to 21 days after birth. Adult northern long-eared bats can live up to 19 years.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.