Yuma Clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

A marsh bird the size of a chicken, the Yuma clapper rail is gray-brown above and buffy-cinnamon below, mottled brown or gray on its rump and has brownish-gray cheeks and flanks barred with black and white. Its somewhat orange bill is long, slender and slightly down-curved. The Yuma clapper rail is a water bird with long legs and a short tail.

  • States/US Territories in which the Yuma Clapper rail, Entire is known to or is believed to occur:  Arizona , California
  • US Counties in which the Yuma Clapper rail, Entire is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
  • USFWS Refuges in which the Yuma Clapper rail, Entire is known to occur:  Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge, Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, Imperial National Wildlife Refuge  ... Show All Refuges
  • Additional species information
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
03/11/1967 Southwest Region (Region 2) Entire

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
02/02/2005 70 FR 5460 5463 5-Year Review of Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Black-capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane
09/27/2007 72 FR 54922 54923 Virgin River Habitat Conservation and Recovery Program, Clark County, NV, Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) and notice of public meetings
02/10/2010 75 FR 6697 6698 Draft Yuma Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) Recovery Plan, First Revision
03/11/1967 32 FR 4001 Endangered Species List - 1967
07/27/2007 72 FR 54922 54923 Virgin River Habitat Conservation and Recovery Program, Clark County, NV
11/29/2002 67 FR 71193 71194 Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement adn Final, Roosevelt Habitat Conservation Plan for Incidental Take by the Salt River Project.

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
02/10/2010 Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Yuma Clapper Rail View Implementation Progress Draft Revision 1
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
02/10/2010 75 FR 6697 6698 Draft Yuma Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) Recovery Plan, First Revision
  • Notice Draft Recovery Plan Availability
02/02/2005 70 FR 5460 5463 5-Year Review of Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Black-capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane
  • Notice 5-year Review
Five Year Review
Date Title
09/12/2006 Yuma Clapper Rail 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Yuma Clapper rail.

» Conservation Plans

Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) (learn more)
HCP Plan Summaries
Coachella Valley Multi-Species HCP
Lower Colorado River MSCP
Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Plan (LCR MSCP)
Salt River Project Roosevelt Lake Habitat Conservation Plan
Safe Harbor Agreements (SHA): (learn more)
SHA Plan Summaries
Tempe, City of, Rio Salado SHA

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

Species is associated with dense emergent riparian vegetation. Requires wet substrate (mudflat, sandbar) with dense herbaceous or woody vegetation for nesting and foraging. Fresh-water marshes dominated by cattail or bulrush are preferred habitat. Early successional marshes with little residual vegetation may be preferred as well. Habitat should be in a mosaic of vegetated areas interspersed with shallow (less than 12") open water areas. Minimum size of suitable habitats is unclear, but have been found in areas as small as 2-3 acres depending on the quality of the mosaic. Typically found below 4,500 feet of elevation.

Food Habits

Primarily crayfish, with small fish, frogs, and aquatic invertebrates also taken.

Movement / Home Range

Most individuals do not migrate, but have minor seasonal changes in their activity areas. Juveniles do disperse to nearby habitats. The recent extension of the range north along the lower Colorado River implies that rails are capable of longer distance movements, although the presence of scattered habitat patches for resting is likely important. Seasonal availability of food may be important factor in the need to migrate greater distances.

Reproductive Strategy

Rails establish pair bonds and territories in March-May, with nesting in May through June. One clutch is born per year. Juveniles are ready to breed the spring following their birth.

Other

Important threats: loss of marsh habitat through channelization, dredging/filling activities, decline in quality of marsh habitat due to build-up residual vegetation (dead stems and leaves of cattails or bulrush) that clogs movement through the vegetation, and selenium contamination of the prey base.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.