freira (Pterodroma madeira)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

No Description Available

 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
1995-01-12 Foreign (Headquarters) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
1995-01-12 00:00:00.0 60 FR 2899 2905 ETWP; Addition of 30 African Birds to List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife
1994-03-28 00:00:00.0 59 FR 14496 14502 ETWP; Proposed Addition of 30 African Birds to the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife
1991-12-16 00:00:00.0 56 FR 65207 65208 ETWP; Finding on Petition and Initiation of Status Review of 53 Foreign Birds; 56 FR 65207 65208

» Recovery

No recovery information is available for the freira.

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the freira.

» Conservation Plans

No conservation plans have been created for freira.

» Petitions

» Life History

Movement / Home Range

Distribution and population Pterodroma madeira has an estimated breeding population of 65-80 pairs (Menezes et al. 2005), in the central mountain massif of Madeira, Portugal, though subfossil remains elsewhere in Madeira and on the neighbouring island of Porto Santo (Zino et al. 2001) suggest that it was formerly more widespread. Currently, birds are only known to breed on six inaccessible ledges - with 53 of the 63 nests surveyed during the 2006 breeding season found to be active - although ongoing surveys may yet reveal more breeding sites (D. Menezes and P. Oliveira in litt. 2007). A massive forest fire in August 2010 at the species's breeding colony killed several breeding adults and 65% of the year’s chicks. 25 young and 3 adults were found dead at the colony, and only 13 young fledglings were found alive in their underground chambers (P. Oliveira in litt. 2010). As well as the dead birds, the fire exacerbated soil erosion, with several nesting burrows having disappeared. Subsequently, as a result of the ground being barren, making food for predators scarce and the petrel chicks more vulnerable, of the 13 birds originally found alive, only one survived to fledging (BirdLife International 2012). In 2011, 45 nests were found to be occupied with eggs laid in 43 of them. A total of 19 nestlings hatched and 16 chicks fledged (BirdLife International 2012), however, the impact of the fires on the breeding population size is not yet known as the effects of the fire will likely be felt in subsequent years. Little is known about the species's range outside the breeding season.

Other

Medium-sized, grey and white gadfly petrel. Grey upperparts with dark cap and dark "M" across wings. White underparts except for indistinct pale grey half-collar across upper breast. Predominantly dark grey-brown underwing. Similar spp. Fea's Petrel P. feae is virtually identical, but slightly larger with longer, thicker bill and longer wings. Voice Wails and moans at colony. Silent at sea.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.