Yellowcheek Darter (Etheostoma moorei)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The yellowcheek darter is a small and laterally-compressed fish that attains a maximum standard length of about 6.4 cm (2.5 in), and has a moderately sharp snout, deep body, and deep caudal peduncle (Raney and Suttkus 1964). The back and sides are grayish brown, often with darker brown saddles and lateral bars. Breeding males are brightly colored with a bright blue or brilliant turquoise throat and breast and a light-green belly, while breeding females possess orange and red-orange spots but are not brightly colored (Robison and Buchanan 1988).

  • States/US Territories in which the Yellowcheek Darter, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  Arkansas
  • US Counties in which the Yellowcheek Darter, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
09/08/2011 Southeast Region (Region 4) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
05/24/2012 77 FR 30988 30992 Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace:Proposed rule; reopening of comment period and announcement of public hearing.
01/06/1989 54 FR 554 579 ETWP; Animal Notice of Review; 54 FR 554 579
08/09/2011 76 FR 48722 48741 Endangered Status for the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace: Final rule.
06/24/2010 75 FR 36035 36057 Listing the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace as Endangered Throughout Their Ranges
06/13/2002 67 FR 40657 40679 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Species That Are Candidates or Proposed for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Recycled Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
09/18/1985 50 FR 37958 37967 Review of Vertebrate Wildlife; Notice of Review; 50 FR 37958-37967
11/09/2009 74 FR 57804 57878 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
05/11/2005 70 FR 24870 24934 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates or Proposed for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule
05/04/2004 69 FR 24876 24904 Review of Species That Are Candidates or Proposed for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
11/21/1991 56 FR 58804 58836 ETWP; Animal Candidate Review for Listing as Endangered or Threatened Species; 56 FR 58804 58836
10/16/2012 77 FR 63603 63668 Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace: Final rule.
12/30/1982 47 FR 58454 58460 Review of Vertebrate Wildlife for Listing as End. or Thr. Species
09/12/2006 71 FR 53756 53835 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates or Proposed for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions
10/12/2011 76 FR 63360 63418 Proposed Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace; Proposed Rule
11/15/1994 59 FR 58982 59028 ETWP; Animal Candidate Review for Listing as Endangered or Threatened Species.
12/10/2008 73 FR 75176 75244 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule
12/06/2007 72 FR 69034 69106 Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions; Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule
10/30/2001 66 FR 54808 54832 ETWP; Review of Plant and Animal Species That Are Candidates or Proposed for Listing as Endangered or Threatened,Annual Notice of Findings on Recycled Petitions, and Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule

» Recovery

No recovery information is available for the Yellowcheek Darter.

» Critical Habitat

Date Citation Page Title Document Type Status
10/16/2012 77 FR 63603 63668 Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace: Final rule. Final Rule Final designated
10/12/2011 76 FR 63360 63418 Proposed Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cumberland Darter, Rush Darter, Yellowcheek Darter, Chucky Madtom, and Laurel Dace; Proposed Rule Proposed Rule Not Required

To learn more about critical habitat please see http://ecos.fws.gov/crithab

» Conservation Plans

Safe Harbor Agreements (SHA): (learn more)
SHA Plan Summaries
Upper Little Red River, Programmatic SHA

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

The yellowcheek darter inhabits high-gradient headwater tributaries with clear water, permanent flow, moderate to strong riffles, and gravel, cobble, and boulder substrates (Robison and Buchanan 1988).

Food Habits

Prey items consumed by the yellowcheek darter include blackfly larvae, stoneflies, mayflies and other aquatic insects.

Movement / Home Range

Movement is not well understood. During non-spawning months, there is a general movement to portions of the riffle with smaller substrate, such as gravel or cobble, and less turbulence (Robison and Harp 1981). Weston and Johnson (2005) observed that the yellowcheek darter moved very little during a one-year migration study. It was noted the yellowcheek darter appears to be a relatively non-mobile species, with 19 of 22 recaptured individuals found within nine meters (29.5 ft) of their original capture position after periods of several months (Weston and Johnson 2005). Yellowcheek darter is endemic to the Little Red River system in the Boston Mountains of north central Arkansas. It occurs in the South, Archey, Middle, Beech, and Devils Forks of the Little Red River.

Reproductive Strategy

Yellowcheek Darter males and females reach sexual maturity at one year of age(McDaniel 1984). Spawning occurs from late May through June in portions of riffles with swift to moderately swift water velocities, often around or under the largest substrate particles (McDaniel 1984), although brooding females have been found at the head of riffles in smaller gravel substrate (Wine et al. 2000). Researchers have suggested the yellowcheek darterYellowcheek Darter deposits eggs on the undersides of large cobble in swift water (McDaniel 1984). Wine and Blumenshine (2002) noted, during laboratory spawning, yellowcheek darter females bury themselves in fine gravel or sand substrates (often behind large cobble or boulders) with only their heads and caudal fin exposed. A male yellowcheek darter will then position upstream of the buried female and fertilize her eggs as she releases them in a vibrating motion. Clutch size and nest defense behavior were not observed by Wine and Blumenshine (2002), but laboratory spawning efforts by Conservation Fisheries, Inc. noted clutch sizes were routinely between 20-40 eggs (CFI 2007).

Other

Maximum lifespan is around five years (McDaniel 1984).

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.