Alabama lampmussel (Lampsilis virescens)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:    and  

General Information

The Alabama lampmussel is a medium sized freshwater mussel usually measuring less than 75 millimeters (mm; ~3 inches (in.)) in length with a moderately thick/moderately inflated shell that is often tawny to greenish yellow, with white nacre (Williams et al. 2008).

Population detail

The FWS is currently monitoring the following populations of the Alabama lampmussel 

  • Population location: Wherever found; Except where listed as Experimental Populations

    Listing status:  Endangered

    • States/US Territories in which this population is known to or is believed to occur:  Alabama , Tennessee
    • US Counties in which this population is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
  • Population location: U.S.A. (AL;The free-flowing reach of the Tennessee R. from the base of Wilson Dam downstream to the backwaters of Pickwick Reservoir [about 12 RM (19 km)] and the lower 5 RM [8 km] of all tributaries to this reach in Colbert and Lauderdale Cos., see 17.85(a))

    Listing status:  Experimental Population, Non-Essential

    • States/US Territories in which this population is known to or is believed to occur:  Alabama
    • US Counties in which this population is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
1976-06-14 Southeast Region (Region 4) Wherever found; Except where listed as Experimental Populations
2001-06-14 Southeast Region (Region 4) U.S.A. (AL;The free-flowing reach of the Tennessee R. from the base of Wilson Dam downstream to the backwaters of Pickwick Reservoir [about 12 RM (19 km)] and the lower 5 RM [8 km] of all tributaries to this reach in Colbert and Lauderdale Cos., see 17.85(a))

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
2010-04-09 00:00:00.0 75 FR 18233 18234 5-Year Status Reviews of 10 Southeastern Species; Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information
2001-06-14 00:00:00.0 66 FR 32250 32264 ETWP; Establishment of Nonessential Experimental Population Status for 16 Freshwater Mussels and 1 Freshwater Snail (Anthony's Riversnail) in the Free-Flowing Reach of the Tennessee River below the Wilson Dam, Colbert and Lauderdale Counties, AL
1976-06-14 00:00:00.0 41 FR 24062 24067 Endangered Status for 159 Taxa of Animals; 41 FR 24062 24067
1975-09-26 00:00:00.0 40 FR 44392 44333 CITES: Proposed Endangered Status for 216 Species on Convention Appendix I; 40 FR 44392 44333
2001-08-21 00:00:00.0 66 FR 43808 43809 ETWP; Establishment of Nonessential Experimental Population Status for 16 Freshwater Mussels and 1 Freshwater Snail (Anthony's Riversnail) in the Free-Flowing Reach of the Tennessee River below the Wilson Dam, Colbert and Lauderdale Counties, AL; Correction
1999-05-27 00:00:00.0 64 FR 28779 28791 ETWP; Proposed Establishment of Nonessential Experimental Population Status for Sixteen Freshwater Mussels (Alabama
Special Rule Publications
Date Citation Page Title
2001-06-14 00:00:00.0 66 FR 32250 32264 ETWP; Establishment of Nonessential Experimental Population Status for 16 Freshwater Mussels and 1 Freshwater Snail (Anthony's Riversnail) in the Free-Flowing Reach of the Tennessee River below the Wilson Dam, Colbert and Lauderdale Counties, AL
1999-05-27 00:00:00.0 64 FR 28779 28791 ETWP; Proposed Establishment of Nonessential Experimental Population Status for Sixteen Freshwater Mussels (Alabama

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
1985-07-02 Alabama Lamp Pearly Mussel View Implementation Progress Final
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
2010-04-09 75 FR 18233 18234 5-Year Status Reviews of 10 Southeastern Species; Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
Five Year Review
Date Title
2012-08-28 Alabama Lampmussel (Lampsilis virescens) 5-Year Review: Summary and Evaluation

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Alabama lampmussel.

» Conservation Plans

No conservation plans have been created for Alabama lampmussel.

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

It historically occurred in small creeks to large rivers; however, at present, it only seems to persist in small to moderate-sized streams in areas of slow to moderate current within sand and gravel substrates. The lampmussel has also been found in areas with stands of water willow (Justicia americana) (Williams et al. 2008).

Movement / Home Range

The Alabama lampmussel historically occurred from the headwaters in eastern Tennessee downstream to Muscle Shoals in northwestern Alabama (Mirarchi 2004, Williams et al. 2008). It was known to occur in the PRR (Jackson Co., AL), Bear Creek (Colbert Co., AL), Little Bear Creek (Franklin Co., AL), a tributary to Bear Creek, Spring Creek (Colbert Co., AL), and Anderson Creek (Lauderdale Co., AL), a tributary to the Elk River (Ortmann 1918, Ortmann 1925, Isom and Yokley 1968, Isom and Yokley 1973) in northern Alabama, and the Emory River (Roane and Morgan counties, TN), and Coal Creek (Anderson Co., TN), a tributary to the Clinch River (Ortmann 1918, Ortmann 1925), in eastern Tennessee. It has been eliminated throughout a majority of its historic range, and is now restricted to only the upper reaches of the PRR system, Jackson County, Alabama, and potentially into Franklin County, Tennessee (Parmalee and Bogan 1998), and in the upper Emory River, Morgan County, Tennessee (Dinkens et al. 2012).

Reproductive Strategy

This species is a long-term brooder and is gravid from late summer or autumn into the following summer (Williams et al. 2008). Dr. Paul Johnson's work at the Tennessee Aquarium Research Institute and AABC have successfully transformed lampmussels on several different fish species in the family Centrarchidae, including: rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), bluegill sunfish (L. macrochirus), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), spotted bass (M. punctulatus), largemouth bass (M. salmoides), and redeye bass (M. coosae) (P. Johnson unpublished data, Fobian and Johnson 2010, Johnson and Hubbs 2010). The banded sculpin (Cottus carolinae) was also reported as a potential host (P. Johnson unpublished data).

» Other Resources

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ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

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