Shrubby reed-mustard (Schoenocrambe suffrutescens)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The shrubby reed-mustard (Glaucocarpum suffrutescens) is a perennial herb in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The clumped stems are 10 to 25 cm (4 to 12 inches) tall arising from a branching woody root crown. The leaves are entire with a smooth margin, 1.0 to 2.5 cm (0.4 to 1 inch) long and 0.3 to 1.0 cm (0.12 to 0.4 inch) wide. The leaf blades are alternately arranged on the stem and are attached to the stem by a short petiole. The shrubby reed-mustard flowers have petals that are light yellow or greenish yellow and spatulately shaped measuring about 10 mm (0.4 inch) long and 3 mm (0.12 inch) wide. The entire flowers are displayed in a raceme of, commonly, 5 to 20 flowers at the end of the plantís leafy stems (Rollins 1938; Welsh and Chatterley 1985; Welsh et al. 1987).

  • States/US Territories in which the Shrubby reed-mustard is known to or is believed to occur:  Utah
  • US Counties in which the Shrubby reed-mustard is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
10/06/1987 Mountain-Prairie Region (Region 6)

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
07/01/1975 40 FR 27924 Review of Status of Vascular Plants
09/23/1993 58 FR 49522 49523 Availability of a Draft Recovery Plan for Three Utah Reed-Mustards; Clay Reed-Mustard (Schoenocrambe argillacea), Barnaby Reed-Mustard (Schoenocrambe barnebyi), and Shrubby Reed-Mustard (Schoenocrambe suffrutescens) for Review and Comment
10/06/2008 73 FR 58261 58262 5-Year Reviews of Three Wildlife Species and Eight Plant Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
05/27/2016 81 FR 33698 33700 ETWP; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of 21 Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
10/06/1987 52 FR 37416 37420 Final Rule to Determine Glaucocarpum suffrutescens (Toad-flax Cress) to be End. Species; 52 FR 37416-37419
09/05/1985 50 FR 36118 36122 Proposal to Determine Glaucocarpum suffrutescens to be End. Species w/ Crit. Hab.; 50 FR 36118-36122

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
09/14/1994 Utah Reed-Mustards (3 spp.) View Implementation Progress Final
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
05/27/2016 81 FR 33698 33700 ETWP; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of 21 Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
09/23/1993 58 FR 49522 49523 Availability of a Draft Recovery Plan for Three Utah Reed-Mustards; Clay Reed-Mustard (Schoenocrambe argillacea), Barnaby Reed-Mustard (Schoenocrambe barnebyi), and Shrubby Reed-Mustard (Schoenocrambe suffrutescens) for Review and Comment
  • Notice Recovery Plan Avail.
10/06/2008 73 FR 58261 58262 5-Year Reviews of Three Wildlife Species and Eight Plant Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
Five Year Review
Date Title
11/08/2010 Schoenocrambe suffrutescens (Shrubby Reed-mustard) 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

Date Citation Page Title Document Type Status
09/05/1985 50 FR 36118 36122 Proposal to Determine Glaucocarpum suffrutescens to be End. Species w/ Crit. Hab.; 50 FR 36118-36122 Proposed Rule Unknown

To learn more about critical habitat please see http://ecos.fws.gov/crithab

» Conservation Plans

No conservation plans have been created for Shrubby reed-mustard.

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

Shrubby reed-mustard occurs along semi-barren, white-shale layers of the Evacuation Creek member of the Green River Formation in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah (52 FR 37416; Franklin 1995). The habitat of this plant is disjunct knolls and benches resembling small extremely dry desert islands surrounded by mixed desert shrub and pinyon-juniper woodland (52 FR 37416; Franklin 1995).

Reproductive Strategy

Flowering occurs from April to May and fruiting occurs May to June (Service 1994b). Shrubby reed-mustard plants produce a few (four) to many (over one hundred) inflorescence each year. The five to twenty flowers on each inflorescence open acropetally (Trepedino and Bowlin n.d.; Service 1994b). Flowers are fragrant in the mornings, but the fragrance declines throughout the day, and over the bloom time of each flower (3-5 days) (Trepedino and Bowlin n.d.; Service 1994b). Reproduction is sexual (Service 1994b; Tepedino 2000). Pollinator exclusion experiments demonstrated that the shrubby reed-mustard is capable of automatic self-pollination (autogamy), but that significantly fewer seeds are set than when open pollination (assumed to be primarily cross-pollination) occurs (Tepedino and Bowlin n.d.; Service 1994b; Tepedino 2000). The following prospective pollinators, all native bee species, were captured while foraging on the flowers: Dialictus perdifficilis, D. sedi, Evylaeus pulveris (all Halictidae), and Andrena walleyi (Andrenidae) (Tepedino and Bowlin n.d.; Service 1994b; Tepedino 2000). These species are small to medium sized solitary bees (Bartlett et al. 2008; DiTerlizzi et al. 2008).

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.