Osterhout milkvetch (Astragalus osterhoutii)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch (also known as Osterhout milkvetch) is a non-woody (herbaceous) plant species in the pea family (Fabaceae). It has many slender and erect stems that grow to, on average, 12 to 40 inches tall. Its leaves are made up of many narrow leaflets– each up to 1 1/2 inches long. In summer, the Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch’s creamy white flowers bloom, hanging along the end of each flowering stalk. In fall, its long, green fruits often turn maroon red when mature. Though distinctive, the Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch may be confused with other milkvetch species in the area. The Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch was first collected by George Osterhout, a Colorado botanist, in 1905. The species is known only to a 15 mile range near the town of Kremmling in Middle Park of northern Colorado, a high elevation sagebrush valley surrounded by ranges of the Rocky Mountains. The Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch grows in five scattered populations on barren shale soils. These soils are rich in selenium, which the Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch concentrates in its tissues— giving the plants a distinctive garlic-like odor. The Kremmling Osterhout milkvetch is threatened by off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation, road and utility construction and maintenance, mining, oil and gas exploration, concentrated livestock use, land development, and other land uses occurring within the species habitat. Some plants were lost when Wolford Dam was constructed. Additional threats include climate change and nonnative invasive plants (weeds). Due to its limited range and few numbers, its vulnerability to habitat modification and loss is high. Therefore, protection of existing populations is vital to the survival of the species.

  • States/US Territories in which the Osterhout milkvetch, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  Colorado
  • US Counties in which the Osterhout milkvetch, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
  • Additional species information
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
1989-07-13 Mountain-Prairie Region (Region 6) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
1988-07-05 00:00:00.0 53 FR 25181 25185 Proposal to Determine Astragalus osterhoutii & Penstemon penlandii to be End. Species; 53 FR 25181-25185
2014-05-06 00:00:00.0 79 FR 25883 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of Nine Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
1989-07-13 00:00:00.0 54 FR 29658 29663 ETWP; Final Rule to Determine Astragalus osterhoustii and Penstemon penlandii to be Endangered Species; 54 FR 29658 29663
2016-05-27 00:00:00.0 81 FR 33698 33700 ETWP; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of 21 Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
1992-09-30 Osterhout Milk-vetch/Penland Beardtongue (2 spp.) View Implementation Progress Final
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
2016-05-27 81 FR 33698 33700 ETWP; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of 21 Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
2014-05-06 79 FR 25883 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of Nine Species in the Mountain-Prairie Region
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Osterhout milkvetch.

» Conservation Plans

No conservation plans have been created for Osterhout milkvetch.

» Petitions

» Life History

No Life History information has been entered into this system for this species.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.