Virginia Round-Leaf birch (Betula uber)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

The Virginia roundleaf birch was originally discovered in 1918 and not seen again until 1975 when a population of 40 trees was found. The only naturally occurring population of this tree is in Smyth County, Virginia along the floodplain of Cressy Creek in an open secondary forest. Several test populations have been established for research and recovery purposes. All introduced populations are on U.S. Forest Service lands within the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area. This deciduous, single-trunked tree reaches a height of approximately 50 feet. The bark is dark brownish-black and has a wintergreen aroma when bruised.

  • States/US Territories in which the Virginia Round-Leaf birch, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  Virginia
  • US Counties in which the Virginia Round-Leaf birch, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
05/27/1978 Northeast Region (Region 5) Wherever found

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
06/16/1976 41 FR 24523 24572 Proposed Endangered Status for 1700 U.S. Plants; 41 FR 24523 24572
07/06/2005 70 FR 38976 Initiation of a 5-Year Review of 5 Listed Species: The Virginia Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus fuscus), Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus), Northeastern Bulrush (Scirpus ancistrochaetus), Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail (Succinea chittenangoensis), and Virginia Round-Leaf Birch (Betula uber)
04/26/1978 43 FR 17910 179?? Final Determination that Eleven Plant Taxa are Endangered and Two Plant Taxa are Threatened Species
11/16/1994 59 FR 59173 59177 ETWP; Reclassification of the Virginia Round-Leaf Birch (Betula Uber) From Endangered to Threatened
08/04/2010 75 FR 47025 47026 Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of Five Listed Species: Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel, Northeastern Bulrush, Furbish Lousewort, Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail, and Virginia Round-Leaf Birch
12/06/1993 58 FR 64281 64285 ETWP; Proposed Reclassification of Betula Uber (Virginia Round-Leaf Birch) From Endangered to Threatened

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
09/24/1990 Virginia Round-leaf Birch View Implementation Progress Final Revision 2
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
07/06/2005 70 FR 38976 Initiation of a 5-Year Review of 5 Listed Species: The Virginia Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus fuscus), Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus), Northeastern Bulrush (Scirpus ancistrochaetus), Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail (Succinea chittenangoensis), and Virginia Round-Leaf Birch (Betula uber)
  • Notice 5-year Review
08/04/2010 75 FR 47025 47026 Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of Five Listed Species: Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel, Northeastern Bulrush, Furbish Lousewort, Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail, and Virginia Round-Leaf Birch
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
Five Year Review
Date Title
10/04/2006 Virginia Round-leaf Birch 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Virginia Round-Leaf birch.

» Conservation Plans

No conservation plans have been created for Virginia Round-Leaf birch.

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

This birch is a subcanopy tree growing in rocky debris that is strongly acidic and very permeable. The natural population is within a narrow strip of second-growth forest that includes many sweet and yellow birches. The band of forest is nearly surrounded by agricultural land.

Reproductive Strategy

Reproduction is presumably asexual. The tree flowers in late April to early May with fruiting in September.

Other

An analysis of cross-breeding studies with this species indicates that it is actually a variation of the common sweet birch. Cultivated birch seedlings have increased the current population numbers. While the single natural population has continued to dwindle, recovery for the round-leaf birch hinges on the successful establishment of these cultivated populations.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.