Maguire daisy (Erigeron maguirei)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

General Information

Erigeron maguirei is a member of the sunflower family, and is a perennial herb with a branched woody base. Its stems are decumbent (lying on the ground with the tip ascending) to sprawling or erect. Its basal leaves are spatulate shaped to oblanceolate (the shape of the leaf is longer than it is wide with the broadest portion of the leaf at the tip and narrower at the base). Its leaves and stems are covered with abundant stiff, coarse, white hairs. Its flowers are dime sized with white or pinkish-white petals. Bits of sand commonly cling to the hairs of the leaves and stems. The species is further described in our June 19, 1996, final rule reclassifying the species as threatened (61 FR 31054).

  • States/US Territories in which the Maguire daisy is known to or is believed to occur:  Utah
  • US Counties in which the Maguire daisy is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
09/05/1985 Mountain-Prairie Region (Region 6)

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
07/27/1984 49 FR 30211 30214 Proposal to Determine Erigeron maguirei var. maguirei (Maguire daisy) to be End. Species; 49 FR 30211-30214
09/05/1985 50 FR 36089 36092 Determination of End. Status for Erigeron maguirei var. maguirei (Magurie Daisy); 50 FR 36089-36092
05/16/2008 73 FR 28410 28423 Proposed Removal of Erigeron maguirei From the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Plants; Availability of Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan
06/19/1996 61 FR 31054 31058 ETWP; Reclassification of Erigeron maguirei (Maguire daisy) From Endangered to Threatened
04/07/2006 71 FR 17900 17902 Initiation of a 5-Year Review of Maguire Daisy, Holmgren Milk-Vetch, Shivwits Milk-Vetch, Virgin River Chub, Woundfin, and Kanab Ambersnail
01/19/2011 76 FR 3029 3044 Removal of Erigeron maguirei (Maguire Daisy) From the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Plants; Availability of Final Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan

» Recovery

Current Recovery Plan(s)
Date Title Plan Action Status Plan Status
08/15/1995 Maguire Daisy (Erigeron maguirei) Recovery Plan View Implementation Progress Final
Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
01/19/2011 76 FR 3029 3044 Removal of Erigeron maguirei (Maguire Daisy) From the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Plants; Availability of Final Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan
  • Final Delisting, Recovered
  • Notice Doc. Availability, Final Post Delisting Monitoring Plan
05/16/2008 73 FR 28410 28423 Proposed Removal of Erigeron maguirei From the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Plants; Availability of Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan
  • Notice 5-year Review, Completion
  • Notice Doc. Availability, Draft Post Delisting Monitoring Plan
  • Proposed Delisting, Recovered
04/07/2006 71 FR 17900 17902 Initiation of a 5-Year Review of Maguire Daisy, Holmgren Milk-Vetch, Shivwits Milk-Vetch, Virgin River Chub, Woundfin, and Kanab Ambersnail
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
Five Year Review
Date Title
05/19/2008 Maguire Daisy 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Maguire daisy.

» Conservation Plans

Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCA): (learn more)
CCA Plan Summaries
Central Utah Navajo Sandstone Endemics

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

Erigeron maguirei has been located from 1,585 to 2,621 meters (m) (5,200 to 8,600 feet (ft)) in elevation (Clark et al. 2006, pp. 9–11). Highest plant densities occur on mesa tops between 1,829 and 2,134 m (6,000 and 7,000 ft) in elevation (Kass 1990, p. 27; Service 1995, p. 2; Clark 2001, p. 15; Clark et al. 2006, p. 14). Erigeron maguirei has been found primarily in the Dwarf Mountain Mahogany Slickrock plant community, a community endemic to the Colorado Plateau Region (Heil 1989, p. 23; Clark 2001, pp. 15–16; Clark et al. 2006, p. 15). E. maguirei also is associated with pinyon juniper–tall shrub, ponderosa pine–tall shrub slickrock pockets, mesic canyon bottoms, mountain shrub, and intermittent riparian communities (Kass 1990, p. 22; Harper and Van Buren 1998, p. 1; Clark 2002, pp. 15–16; Clark et al. 2005, p. 7; Clark et al. 2006, p. 15). Erigeron maguirei occurs primarily on the Navajo Sandstone formation. Individuals have been located within steep, narrow, dry, rocky, and sandy canyon or wash bottoms of the Wingate, Chinle, and Navajo Sandstone formations; sandstone walls of the Wingate, Navajo, and Cutler formations; cracks of large boulders; slickrock; and atop mesas of the Navajo Sandstone formation (Cronquist 1947, p. 165; Anderson 1982, pp. 1–2; Heil 1989, pp. 25–26; Kass 1990, p. 22; Harper and Van Buren 1998, p. 1). Populations within canyon bottoms are apparently established from seeds dispersed by wind or overland flow from source populations on the mesa tops (Heil 1989, p. 25; Kass 1990, p. 27; Service 1995, p. 2). These canyon populations are generally small compared with those on the mesa tops (Heil 1989, p. 25; Kass 1990, p. 27; Service 1995, p. 2).

Reproductive Strategy

Flowering occurs from May to June and takes 4 to 6 weeks to go from the small green “button” bud stage to completion of anthesis, when the flower is no longer open and functional (Alston and Tepedino 2005, p. 54; Clark et al. 2006, p. 17). It appears that Erigeron maguirei lacks self compatibility, and that pollinators are necessary for cross pollination to occur (Alston and Tepedino 2005, p. 61). Because of the open nature of the flower head, E. maguirei tends to be visited by opportunistic insects searching for nectar (Alston and Tepedino 2005, p. 60). Pollinators include various flies, wasps, and bees (Alston and Tepedino 2005, p. 60).

Other

Van Buren and Harper (2002, p. 1) collected demographic data on three Erigeron maguirei populations for a period of 9 years. The demographic data collected included plant diameter, size class, plant height, plant condition, and number of flower heads produced for individual tagged plants (Van Buren and Harper 2002, p. 2). At the Eagle Canyon study site, 124 plants were tagged in 1992 and 41 of these were still alive in 2001 (Van Buren and Harper 2002, pp. 2–3). This demographic monitoring study suggests the species is long lived, has a low mortality rate, and has the ability to replace individuals at a rate that compensates for mortality (Van Buren and Harper 2002, pp. 2–5). Overall, monitored populations appear stable (Van Buren and Harper 2002, p. 2).

» Other Resources

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ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

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