Pima Pineapple cactus (Coryphantha scheeri var. robustispina)

Federal Register | Recovery | Critical Habitat | Conservation Plans | Petitions | Life History

Listing Status:   

Where Listed: WHEREVER FOUND

General Information

A low-growing hemispherical cactus that may be found as single or multi-stemmed plants. Adults measure 4-18 inches tall and 3-7 inches in diameter. The spines are stout and arranged in clusters with one central hooked spine and 6-15 radial straight spines. Spines are originally straw colored, but become black with age. Flowers are yellow and the fruit is a green ellipsoid.

  • States/US Territories in which the Pima Pineapple cactus is known to or is believed to occur:  Arizona
  • US Counties in which the Pima Pineapple cactus is known to or is believed to occur:  View All
  • USFWS Refuges in which the Pima Pineapple cactus is known to occur:  Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge
  • Countries in which the the Pima Pineapple cactus is known to occur:  Mexico
  • Additional species information
 
Current Listing Status Summary
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
09/23/1993 Southwest Region (Region 2)

» Federal Register Documents

Federal Register Documents
Date Citation Page Title
09/23/1993 58 FR 49875 49880 ETWP; Determination of Endangered Status for the Plant Pima Pinapple Cactus (Coryphantha Scheeri var. Robustispina)
02/02/2005 70 FR 5460 5463 5-Year Review of Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Black-capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane
04/20/1992 57 FR 14374 14378 ETWP; Proposal to List the Plant Coryphantha Scheeri var. Robustispina (Pima Pineapple Cactus) as Endangered
04/15/2015 80 FR 20241 20243 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Black-Lace Cactus, Bone Cave Harvestman, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Texas Snowbells, and Walker’s Manioc in the Southwest Region (Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information.

» Recovery

Other Recovery Documents
Date Citation Page Title Document Type
04/15/2015 80 FR 20241 20243 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Black-Lace Cactus, Bone Cave Harvestman, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Texas Snowbells, and Walker’s Manioc in the Southwest Region (Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information.
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
02/02/2005 70 FR 5460 5463 5-Year Review of Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Black-capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane
  • Notice 5-year Review
Five Year Review
Date Title
02/08/2007 Pima Pineapple Cactus 5-Year Review

» Critical Habitat

No critical habitat rules have been published for the Pima Pineapple cactus.

» Conservation Plans

Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) (learn more)
HCP Plan Summaries
Pima County Multi-Species Conservation Plan, under Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan

» Petitions

» Life History

Habitat Requirements

Alluvial basins and hillsides in semi-desert grasslands, desert scrub and the transition area between the two. Most commonly found on open areas on flat ridge-tops or slopes of less than 10-15 percent. Soils range from shallow to deep and silty to rocky. The distribution of the cactus is patchy, with highly variable densities, and widely distributed across the areas of suitable habitat. Few locations have significant populations, and those tend to be clumped with in a smaller area. Due to topography, hydrology, plant community type, and elevation, there are extensive areas within the overall range of the cactus that do not qualify as habitat. Lands subject to considerable disturbances due to human development or other land uses generally do not support the cactus

Reproductive Strategy

The species can reproduce from seed or from vegetative offshoots. Flowering is timed to the summer rains (mid-July through August), with each plant producing flowers over a 1-3 day period. The species does not self-pollinate in the wild and bees or honeybees are the presumed pollinators. Fruits mature in about two weeks and are seen on the plant in August and September. The fruit is succulent and sweet, with rabbits and rodents acting as seed dispersers. Young plants are not often found, and it is uncertain if this is due to difficulty in locating small plants or if seedling establishment is low.

Other

This cactus is vulnerable to ground disturbing activities that remove or degrade natural vegetation cover, including mining, livestock grazing, and urban/exurban development that also fragments remaining habitat areas. Expansion of non-native invasive plants that alter the fire frequency and intensity, predation by insects and small mammals, and extended drought are also threats to the cactus.

» Other Resources

NatureServe Explorer Species Reports -- NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports -- ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.