Recovery Plan Ad Hoc Report results

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Plan Title Plan Stage Plan Lead Region (FWS) Plan Lead Office (FWS) Species Common Name Species Scientific Name Action Priority Action Number Action Description Action Status Estimated Initiation Date Estimated Completion Date Action Lead Agencies Responsible Parties Work Types Labor Types Comments Implementation Activity Number Implementation Activity Description Implementation Activity Status Implementation Activity Estimated Initiation Date Implementation Activity Estimated Completion Date Implementation Activity Labor Types Implementation Activity Work Types Implementation Activity Responsible Parties Implementation Activity Comments Implementation Activity Species
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 1 1.1 Continue to utilize existing legislation and regulations to protect species and their habitat Ongoing Current FY 1995 - FY 1999 FY 2076 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division, U.S. Forest Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency , GA and TN Nature Conservancy Acquisition: Easement, Acquisition: Fee Title, Management: General, Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation, Management: Land Use, Other: Information and Education, Other: Law Enforcement, Other: Regulations Volunteer, Species Expert, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance FWS and NRCS' proposal nominating the Conasauga as a new Working Lands for Wildlife landscape project was selected Dec. 2016, and FY17 WLFW projects are being implemented to improve water quality in the basin. The Conasauga also was selected as a NRCS RCPP project, with a $1,000,000 grant to The Nature Conservancy to implement projects that improve water quality and protect agricultural viability -- FWS and TNC worked with local landowners to identify farmlands where constructed wetlands could treat stormwater runoff in agricultural ditches.The draft Etowah HCP remains quiescent -- lack of urban development in the basin reduced the need/demand for the HCP. The HCP's culvert and utility line measures have been incorporated into Corps NWP requirements, and many of the Etowah basin counties now have buffer ordinances and post-construction stormwater requirements. In both the Etowah and Conasauga basins, FWS continues to (1) work with other Federal agencies to implement actions to conserve and recover the species, (2) encourage establishment of Corps mitigation banks and Wetland Trust Fund sites to protect and restore high priority Conasauga and Etowah reaches; (3) work with private landowners under the PFW program to restore stream habitat; and (4) work with local governments to ensure long-term growth has the least impact on listed species and their habitats. In the Conasauga, the Service is working to develop a new national wildlife refuge that would protect the entire reach of amber darter and Conasauga logperch habitat in the basin. 1.1-1 The draft Etowah HCP remains quiescent -- lack of urban development in the basin reduced the need/demand for the HCP. Culvert and utility line HCP measures have been incorporated into Corps NWP requirements. FWS continues to (1) work with other Federal agencies to implement actions to conserve and recover the species, including review of Corps permit applications, FWHA proposed road projects, and other federal projects; (2)encourage establishment of Corps mitigation banks and Wetland Trust Fund sites to protect and restore high priority Conasauga and Etowah reaches; (3) work with private landowners under the PFW program to restore stream habitat; and (4) work with local governments to ensure long-term growth has the least impact on listed species and their habitats. In the Conasauga, the Service is working to develop a new national wildlife refuge that would protect the entire reach of amber darter and Conasauga logperch habitat in the basin. Ongoing Current 1998 Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 1 1.2.2-1.2.3 Conduct research into life history and habitat requirements Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 FY 2020 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered Species Division, U.S. Forest Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency , USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Tennessee Heritage Program, GA and TN Nature Conservancy Research, Research: Population Surveys, Research: Habitat Requirements, Research: Management Techniques, Research: Demographic Studies, Research: Environmental Contaminants, Research: Reintroduction Graduate Student, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance Long-term sampling at fixed locations in the Conasauga shows a gradual decline in modeled species richness, including: (1) Tricolor shiners and Coosa madtom not likely to be found; (2) Amber darter declining rapidly; (3) Coosa shiner declining,(4) ​Conasauga logperch gradually declining, and (5) lack fo similar declines in the Etowah River, wheremost species are doing well or are holding. Less decline observed in upper portion of the Conasauga, except amber darter which declines significantly. FWS-funded research identified nutrients, glyphosate/surfactant breakdown products, and estrogens as additional threats in the basin, and research continues to evaluate fish community status and quantify intersex fish prevalence in the basin relative to similar watersheds. New threats in the basin in FY 17 included construction of the new inland port on Sumac Creek, installation of a 100+ mile long natural gas pipeline that required open trench cuts of multiple Conasauga tributaries, and modification of the City of Chatsworth water pollution control plant to increase wasteload allocations, and subsequent discharge into Mill Creek.Studied completed 2016 documented high nutrients, glyponsate breakdown products, and estrogens in Conasauga waters, as well as a percentage of intersex fishes. A study on intersex fish in the basin continues in FY 17, as well as evalution of fish community structure (Freeman, CFI). Studies evaluating genetic diversity of both species have been completed. Ongoing research in the Conasauga focuses on evaluating water quality and other factors affecting population stability - preliminary results indicate high nutrients and hormones in water and sediment samples, and a high incidence of transgender fishes. Juvenile logperch are being tracked to determine their habitat needs and dispersal patterns. Additional information is needed on both fishes' life history and habitat requirements. 1.2.2-1.2.3-1 Studies evaluating genetic diversity of both species have been completed. Ongoing research in the Conasauga focuses on evaluating water quality, particularly levels of Roundup (glyphosate and its surfactant and breakdown products), nutrients, hormones, heavy metals, and other contaminants. Preliminary results indicated a 30% of male fishes collected were intersex (eggs in testes). GAES funded additional studies to further evalute intersex issues in the basin. Partially Complete 2008 Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected USGS, Conservation Fisheries, the Tennessee Aquarium, Duquesne University, and the University of Georgia also are major partners.
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 1 1.2.2-1.2.3 Conduct research into life history and habitat requirements Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 FY 2020 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered Species Division, U.S. Forest Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency , USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Tennessee Heritage Program, GA and TN Nature Conservancy Research, Research: Population Surveys, Research: Habitat Requirements, Research: Management Techniques, Research: Demographic Studies, Research: Environmental Contaminants, Research: Reintroduction Graduate Student, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance Long-term sampling at fixed locations in the Conasauga shows a gradual decline in modeled species richness, including: (1) Tricolor shiners and Coosa madtom not likely to be found; (2) Amber darter declining rapidly; (3) Coosa shiner declining,(4) ​Conasauga logperch gradually declining, and (5) lack fo similar declines in the Etowah River, wheremost species are doing well or are holding. Less decline observed in upper portion of the Conasauga, except amber darter which declines significantly. FWS-funded research identified nutrients, glyphosate/surfactant breakdown products, and estrogens as additional threats in the basin, and research continues to evaluate fish community status and quantify intersex fish prevalence in the basin relative to similar watersheds. New threats in the basin in FY 17 included construction of the new inland port on Sumac Creek, installation of a 100+ mile long natural gas pipeline that required open trench cuts of multiple Conasauga tributaries, and modification of the City of Chatsworth water pollution control plant to increase wasteload allocations, and subsequent discharge into Mill Creek.Studied completed 2016 documented high nutrients, glyponsate breakdown products, and estrogens in Conasauga waters, as well as a percentage of intersex fishes. A study on intersex fish in the basin continues in FY 17, as well as evalution of fish community structure (Freeman, CFI). Studies evaluating genetic diversity of both species have been completed. Ongoing research in the Conasauga focuses on evaluating water quality and other factors affecting population stability - preliminary results indicate high nutrients and hormones in water and sediment samples, and a high incidence of transgender fishes. Juvenile logperch are being tracked to determine their habitat needs and dispersal patterns. Additional information is needed on both fishes' life history and habitat requirements. 1.2.2-1.2.3-2 Funded 2 studies that began in FY15. One was to track the captive propagated Conasauga logperch that were tagged and released in FY13. The second was to collect fish community data, including information on Conasauga logperch and amber darter populations, at the fixed locations where data were collected annually from 1996-2012. Final reports are due Dec. 2015, unless additional funds are made available to continue work in FY16. Ongoing Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 1 1.2.4 Ongoing research on water quality and intersex fish (see info in 1.2.5 Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 FY 2020 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division Other Research: Population Assessment, Research, Research: Population Surveys, Research: Propagation, Research: Environmental Contaminants, Research: Reintroduction, Research: Other Information, Research: Genetics Species Expert FY17 research continues to evaluate fish community status and quantify intersex fish prevalence in the basin relative to similar watersheds. Studied completed 2016 documented high nutrients, glyponsate breakdown products, and estrogens in Conasauga waters, as well as a percentage of intersex fishes. UGA/USGS completed a study on primary Etowah basin stressors in 2007. Studies to evalute Conasauga water quality (DO, agricultural/ residential chemicals) began in FY09, and a study, to evaluate runoff in agricultural ditches began in FY10. 1.2.4-1 UGA/USGS completed a study on primary Etowah basin stressors in 2007, and concluded that urbanization, and particularly increased stormwater runoff, was a major stressor. Other important stressors included loss of riparian buffers, impoundments, culverts that block fish passage, and sedimentation of stream channels. Studies to evalute Conasauga water quality (DO, agricultural/ residential chemicals) began in FY09 and FY10, and a third study, to evaluate the benefits of infiltration BMPs on runoff in agricultural ditches began in FY10. Ongoing Current 2004 Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected USGS and University of Georgia are major partners.
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 1 1.2.5 Investigate the need for habitat improvement Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 GA and TN Nature Conservancy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Tennessee Heritage Program, GA and TN Nature Conservancy Research Graduate Student, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance FWS and NRCS' proposal nominating the Conasauga as a new Working Lands for Wildlife landscape project was selected Dec. 2016, and FY17 WLFW projects are being implemented to improve water quality in the basin. The Conasauga also was selected as a NRCS RCPP project, with a $1,000,000 grant to The Nature Conservancy to implement projects that improve water quality and protect agricultural viability -- FWS and TNC worked with local landowners to identify farmlands where constructed wetlands could treat stormwater runoff in agricultural ditches. UGA completed a study that prioritized reaches in the Conasauga for protection/restoration in 2008; a similar prioritization was conducted in the Etowah in the mid-2000's. Service efforts to establish a Conasauga River National Wildlife Refuge to protect the highest priority Conasauga reaches are ongoing. TNC has acquired high priority habitat in the Conasauga, and several mitigation banks have been established in both basins to enhance habitat for both species. FWS is working with consultants to develop protocols to establish conservation banks in high priority Etowah habitat, including amber darter reaches. 1.2.5-1 UGA completed a study that prioritized reaches in the Conasauga for protection/restoration in 2008; a similar prioritization was conducted in the Etowah as part of the HCP. The Conasauga River National Wildlife Refuge proposal to protect the highest priority Conasauga reaches is awaiting WO approval. TNC has acquired high priority habitat in the Conasauga, and several mitigation banks have been established in both basins to enhance habitat for both species. FWS is working with consultants to develop protocols to establish conservation banks in high priority Etowah habitat. Ongoing Current 2000 Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 2 4 Develop and implement a monitoring program Ongoing Not Current FY 1995 - FY 1999 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division, U.S. Forest Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency , Tennessee Heritage Program, GA and TN Nature Conservancy Research: Population Surveys Volunteer, Graduate Student, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance USGS monitored 10 fixed locations in the Conasauga mainstem from 1996 until 2009, when funding expired. Monitoring of both species in the Etowah and Conasauga now is sporadic due to lack of funding. 4-1 USGS monitored 10 fixed locations in the Conasauga mainstem from 1996 - 2009, when funding expired. Monitoring of both species in the Etowah and Conasauga now is sporadic due to lack of funding. Ongoing Not Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 3 1.2.6 Determine numbers of individuals needed to maintain viable populations Ongoing Current FY 2007 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division Research Labor type not yet selected USGS initiated a study in 2007 to determine current Conasauga logperch population numbers; genetic analysis completed by Anna George (TN Aquarium) in 2007 indicated a population of only 200 adults. 1.2.6-2 USGS initiated a study in 2007 to determine current Conasauga logperch population numbers and status -- results published in 2011 indicate the species likely is declining in the lower part of its range. Genetic analysis completed by Anna George (TN Aquarium) in 2007 indicated a population on only 200 adults. Dr. George currently is conducting more intensive genetics research. Ongoing Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 3 1.3 Solicit help in protecting species and critical habitats Ongoing Current FY 1995 - FY 1999 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division Work type not yet selected Volunteer, Graduate Student, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance, Internal Administrative FWS and Partners have assisted with formation of both the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Conasauga River Alliance, which work to protect stream habitat in the respective basins. FWS and TNC have organized multiple Coosa or Conasauga Summits with representatives from industry, local governments, agriculture interests, environmental groups, academia, and land management to discuss aquatic stressors and protective measures. FWS works with multiple partners in both basins on species recovery. 1.3-1 FWS and Partners have assisted with formation of both the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Conasauga River Alliance, which work to protect stream habitat in the respective basins. FWS and TNC have organized multiple Coosa or Conasauga Summits with representatives from industry, local governments, agriculture interests, environmental groups, academia, and land management to discuss aquatic stressors and protective measures. Ongoing Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 3 1.4 Develop and utilize information and education programs (slide/tape shows, brochures, etc) for local distribution Ongoing Current FY 1995 - FY 1999 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected There is an informative Coosa Basin poster with high-quality photos of the rare aquatic species in the basin. 1.4-1 FWS, TNC, and the Upper Etowah River Alliance are developing a set of playing cards to highlight the rare species of the Etowah and Conasauga basins and to educate about stressors. There is an informative Coosa Basin poster with high-quality photos of the rare aquatic species in the basin, and the Etowah HCP Outreach Coordinator has created numberous fact sheets and other outreach materials to educate about the amber darter and other rare fishes in the basin Ongoing Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 3 3 Determine the feasibility of reestablishing any historic populations of the species Obsolete U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected The Conasauga logperch is endemic to the Conasauga mainstem; the amber darter was relocated in the Etowah basin in the 1990's - no other historic populations are known to have existed. Conasauga logperch propagated in captivity by Conservation Fisheries, marked with different colored subcutaneous tags, were released in 2012 in the Conasauga to augment the wild population and provide information on juvenile habitat use and movements - this augmentation was conducted only after genetic studies of the wild and F1 populations and determination by Service and Tennessee Aquarium geneticists that limited release of F1s would not genetically swamp the wild population. Dispersal of released logperch continues in FY13. 3-1 Conservation Fisheries, Inc. successfully propagated Conasauga logperch in spring 2011. Arc populations of F1 generation fish have been established at both the Tennessee and Georgia Aquariums. Other F1 fish, marked with different colored subcutaneous tags, were released in 2012 in the Conasauga to augment the wild population and provide information on juvenile habitat use and movements - this augmentation was conducted only after genetic studies of the wild and F1 populations and determination by Service and Tennessee Aquarium geneticists that limited release of F1s would not genetically swamp the wild population. Ongoing Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected The Conasauga logperch is endemic to the Conasauga mainstem; the amber darter was relocated in the Etowah basin in the 1990's - no other historic populations are known to have existed.
Conasauga Logperch/Amber Darter (2 spp.) F 4 Georgia Ecological Services Field Office (706) 613-9493 Conasauga logperch Percina jenkinsi 3 5 Annual assessment of recovery program and modify where needed Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division Research: General Internal Administrative The first Coosa Summit was held in 2000; 3 other Coosa Summits and a separate Conasauga Summit (2008) have since been held to evaluate current research data and reevaluate recovery priorities. We plan to hold the next Coosa/Conasauga Summit in early 2014, unless prohibited by Federal government travel restrictions. 5-1 The first Coosa Summit was held in 2000; 3 other Coosa Summits and a separate Conasauga Summit (2008) have since been held to evaluate current research data and reevaluate recovery priorities. We plan to hold the next Coosa/Conasauga Summit in early 2013, unless prohibited by Federal government travel restrictions. Ongoing Current Labor type not yet selected Work type not yet selected