Recovery Plan Ad Hoc Report results

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Plan Title Plan Stage Plan Lead Region (FWS) Plan Lead Office (FWS) Species Common Name Species Scientific Name Action Priority Action Number Action Description Action Status Estimated Initiation Date Estimated Completion Date Action Lead Agencies Responsible Parties Work Types Labor Types Comments Implementation Activity Number Implementation Activity Description Implementation Activity Status Implementation Activity Estimated Initiation Date Implementation Activity Estimated Completion Date Implementation Activity Labor Types Implementation Activity Work Types Implementation Activity Responsible Parties Implementation Activity Comments Implementation Activity Species
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 1 1.2 Secure Chorro Creek bog thistle sites Ongoing Current Other California Army National Guard, City of San Luis Obispo, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, California, Private landowners Acquisition, Acquisition: Easement, Management, Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation, Management: Land Use, Management: Population Monitoring Volunteer, Species Expert, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance, Internal Administrative In progress. Ten of 21 known occurrences are secure (protected) in 2016.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 1 2.2.2 Protect spring sources for Chorro Creek bog thistle Unknown Other California Army National Guard, City of San Luis Obispo, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, California, California Department of Fish and Game, Private landowners Acquisition, Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Volunteer, Species Expert, Internal Technical Assistance In 2016, 10 of 21 known occurrences are protected.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 1 4.1 Monitor populations to ascertain trends Unknown U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service California Army National Guard, California Department of Parks and Recreation, City of San Luis Obispo, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish and Game, Private landowners Research: Demographic Studies Volunteer, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance 1. There is currently no monitoring to ascertain trends for Morro manzanita. Monitoring associated with the construction of the sewer project for the community of Los Osos has provided us with a substantial amount of new population and distribution data. 2. The conservation status of Chorro Creek bog thistle has improved substantially since listing because of an increased number of known occurrences (n = 21) along with an increased number of occurrences that are protected. There are potentially many other locations with habitat that have not been searched, in particular on private land. It is highly likely that additional unknown occurrences exist in San Luis Obispo County, and possibly also in Monterey County to the north and Santa Barbara County to the south. 3. A range-wide survey and census for the Indian Knob mountainbalm was conducted in 2016. There are eight occurrences, two which are "lost." This census will provide a baseline for future efforts.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 2 2.1.1.2 Develop and implement strategies to control non-native plant species Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service California Army National Guard, California Department of Parks and Recreation, City of San Luis Obispo, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Private landowners Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Volunteer, Species Expert, Contract, Internal Field Assistance In habitat for Morro shoulderband snail, Morro manzanita, and Indian Knob mountainbalm, California Department of Parks and Recreation (= State Parks) staff state that they annually prioritize treatment areas on a case by case basis as funding is available. When funding is available, invasive species control is implemented. In Montana de Oro State Park, Morro Strand State Beach, and Morro Bay State Parks. Priority invasive species include Ehrharta calycina, Conicosia pugioniformis, Emex spinosa, Cortaderia species, and Eucalyptus species as they are considered most invasive and conspicuous in the landscape. Lack of funding has precluded most State of California resource agencies (e.g., CDPR and California Department of Fish and Wildlife) from implemeting invasive species control programs on lands where these species are present. Morro Coast Audubon Society hosts regular invasives removal work parties and has a dedicated volunteer work force who remove Ehrharta calycina and Eucalyptus globulus at their Sweet Springs Preserve under the direction of a Recovery Action Plan. The Small Wilderness Area Program does the same for the Elfin Forest Reserve. Both Sweet Springs and Elfin Forest provide habitat for Morro shoulderband snail and Morro manzanita. For Chorro Creek bog thistle, the City of San Luis Obispo has and continues to remove invasive species that threaten this species and its habitat. on their properties.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 2 3.2.2.1 Evaluate the effects of livestock use on Chorro Creek bog thistle Planned FY 2014 Other California Army National Guard, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Research: Other Information Species Expert, Internal Technical Assistance Regarding cattle grazing in and near the habitat of Chorro Creek bog thistle, herbivory and trampling are the two issues. At Camp San Luis Obispo, cattle grazing caused a substantial decrease in established plants and a substantial increase in juvenile plants (Mardesich and Laughlin in USFW 2014). Along with David Chipping (Calif. Polytech. St. Univ., pers. comm. 2012) and Nancy Siepel (Calif. Dept. Transport., San Luis Obispo, pers. comm. 2012) who observed cattle grazing in the vicinity of Chorro Creek bog thistle, we consider the effects of herbivory as minor and not a threat because the spiny plants are generally unpalatable (USFWS 1998). However, trampling can severely damage established plants, especially when water is limited and cattle congregate at the water. The relevant land managers should strictly control and monitor any cattle grazing in the habitat of Chorro Creek bog thistle. Strictly-controlled cattle grazing could possibly benefit Chorro Creek bog thistle by reducing other vegetation (invasive and native) and by providing favorable sites for germination of its seeds.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 2 3.2.2.2 Study the reproductive biology and evaluate the effects of the non-native seedhead weevil on Chorro Creek bog thistle Complete U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Non-governmental organizations Research: Predation Graduate Student, Species Expert, Contract Since 1968 the Eurasian flower-head weevil Rhinocyllus conicus has been introduced at multiple locations in North America (Herr 2004) as a biocontrol agent for invasive (non-native) thistles Carduus and Silybum, including San Luis Obispo County in 1973 (Goeden et al. 1985) and in particular Camp San Luis Obispo in the early 1980's (California Army National Guard in USFWS 2014). The adult weevils congregate on young thistles in early spring to feed and mate. They lay eggs (mean 192 eggs per female) on developing flower heads into which the subsequent larvae tunnel and feed on. Pupation occurs in the flower head, with adults emerging in mid summer. One generation per year is produced (Zwolfer and Harris 1984). By 2005 the weevil occurred in 26 states and Canada (Dodge 2005), with multiple reports of feeding also on native thistle Cirsium (Turner et al. 1987). This weevil was reported feeding on Chorro Creek bog thistle at three occurrences: San Simeon Creek (Herr 2004; Chipping in USFWS 2014;), Laguna Lake Natural Reserve (Herr 2004), and Camp San Luis Obispo (California Army National Guard in USFWS 2014). At San Simeon Creek, 28% of the flower heads were infested throughout the growing season (42% in July 1995), and with 27% (mean) of seeds destroyed in the infested flower heads. Seed loss was 8% of total seed set at the study site (Turner and Herr 1996; Herr 2004; John Herr, U.S. Dept. Agric., Albany, Calif., pers. comm. 2012). Turner and Herr (1996) reported a phenological difference in peak egg laying of the weevil in relation to flower head production of Chorro Creek bog thistle. At Laguna Lake Natural Reserve (Herr 2004), infestation rates were 32% in May (1996) and 5% in July (1995). David Magney (USFWS 2014) saw no weevils at Camp San Luis Obispo in September (2005), although the California Army National Guard (USFWS 2014) subsequently observed weevils feeding on Chorro Creek bog thistle in 2012. Lutz (2013) saw no evidence of weevils at Reservoir Canyon Natural Reserve (occurrence 11). In sum, we consider the Eurasian flower-head weevil a threat because it was seasonally destroying a substantial number of seeds at the occurrence where studied.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 3 2.2.1 Modify roadside maintenance activities for Chorro Creek bog thistle. Ongoing Current Other To be determined Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation, Other: Administration Internal Technical Assistance USFWS discussed this issue with the County of San Luis Obispo in 2016. The County said that they would install signs to alert road crews of the ecological sensitivity of the particular site.
Recovery Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail and Four Plants from San Luis Obispo County F 8 Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (805) 644-1766 Chorro Creek bog thistle Cirsium fontinale var. obispoense 3 5.1 Inform and consult with local lead agencies Ongoing Current U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service California Army National Guard, California Department of Transportation, City of San Luis Obispo, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, California, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish and Game, Private landowners Management: General Volunteer, Species Expert, Internal Technical Assistance, Internal Field Assistance, Internal Administrative The Service works with local lead agencies to ensure that Morro shoulderband snail, Morro manzanita, Indian Knob mountainbalm and Chorro Creek bog thistle are considered during all of their discretionary permit processes and encourages their participation in efforts to conserve the species. .