Recovery Plan Ad Hoc Report results

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Plan Title Plan Stage Plan Lead Region (FWS) Plan Lead Office (FWS) Species Common Name Species Scientific Name Action Priority Action Number Action Description Action Status Estimated Initiation Date Estimated Completion Date Action Lead Agencies Responsible Parties Work Types Labor Types Comments Implementation Activity Number Implementation Activity Description Implementation Activity Status Implementation Activity Estimated Initiation Date Implementation Activity Estimated Completion Date Implementation Activity Labor Types Implementation Activity Work Types Implementation Activity Responsible Parties Implementation Activity Comments Implementation Activity Species
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 1 4.2 Comparison of 2 species of Macbridea Partially Complete Prior to FY 1995 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Universities Research: Genetics Graduate Student, Species Expert Cantino (1985) studied the chromosomes of these 2 species. The study between the two species of Macbridea indicated that they have the same ploidy level, i.e., 2n=18, with nearly identical chromosome length range (2.5-4 µm in M. alba and 2.5 - 4 µm in M. caroliniana). Other genetic studies will be prioritized and funded under conservation measures for the candidate species Macbridea caroliniana. Katherine Farrah Weeks (graduate student) and supervisor, Joan Walker, were conducting a genetic study using allozyme data for M caroliniana (2009 Doctoral thesis- Population ecology of the floodplain herb Macbridea caroliniana (Lamiaceae) with investigations on the species' habitat, breeding system and genetic diversity)
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 2 1.1 Management/monitoring in Apalachicola National Forest (AN) Ongoing Current FY 1995 - FY 1999 Other U.S. Forest Service Management: General Internal Field Assistance Monitoring cost only. Management cost has not yet been determined. Management is an ongoing action conducted by the Forest Service. The ANF has a yearly 120,000+ acre prescribed burning program. According to L. Kirn (2009, pers. comm.), two to three compartments, i.e., management units,burned every year during the growing and dormant seasons. The ANF has an on-going timber-related management/monitoring study in the Hunt Timber Sale: pre- and post-harvest survey data have been collected in two sites (L. Kirn, 2009, pers. comm.). In addition, several years of monitoring data (e.g., documenting presence/absence in each population, and qualitative visual estimate of the density of white-birds-in-a-nest) have been collected in three permanent plots. However, these data were not available for evaluation. Macbridea alba is found scattered under the Apalachicola National Forest Utility ROW of SR 65. Protective measures have been established with Talquin Electric during annual maintenance and the upcoming pole replacement. 2012 Scutellaria floridana: - site # 172 = > 500 individuals (visual estimate), very few individuals blooming. Site was burned 2011. site # 180 = > 1000 individuals (visual estimate), > 50 of the populations was blooming. Site was burned 2012. 2012 Pinguicula ionantha: site # 106 = < 30 individuals (visual estimate) ANF - Field Branch = 115 individuals site # 126 = 105 individuals 2015: Beasley Pond consultation ANForest: a large populationof about 2000 plants was found in compartment 27- at present working with the FS to protect this large population
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 2 1.21 Macbridea alba population biology in ANF Ongoing Not Current Prior to FY 1995 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service Research: Habitat Requirements, Research: Demographic Studies, Research: Other Information Graduate Student, Species Expert Underway by Joan Walker and Deborah White. Demographic data from 11 populations monitored for 10 years indicate that mortality is low, flowering decreases with time since fire, and seedling establishment is rare. Seed bank studies were conducted. Results indicated that a significant percentage of seeds lack dormancy, therefore no persistent seed bank. Pitts-Singer, HAnula, & Walker (2002) study on pollinators indicated that bumble bees were the only visitor large enough to contact the reproductive structures of the flower. Studies of germination and seed bank, one aspect of population biology, have been conducted by Schulze et al. (2002). Since seed production has been documented for this species, but seedlings have rarely been observed in natural populations, the authors investigated the viability of dry-stored and of experimentally buried seeds, the timing of germination, and whether a persistent seed bank was present. The authors observed in the field that seeds germinated while in the infructescences (the fruiting stage of the inflorescence), suggesting that the matured ovules lack dormancy, in addition to the possibility of viviparous seedlings. About 87% of dry-stored seeds were viable (or germinable) for six months after dispersal, but viability of dry-stored and of buried seeds was insignificant after one year. They concluded that a persistent seed bank is not present, based on the lack of emergence of seedlings from soil that was field collected prior to seed dispersal. This lack of seed dormancy and seed bank means that if the established individuals are eliminated, a population cannot re-establish itself. In addition, preserving genetic diversity in an ex-situ facility is not recommended due to the poor viability of dry-stored seeds. In general, Schulze et al. (2002) recommend preserving and protecting established individuals
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 2 3.1 Secure protection for the 4 plants outside AN Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Private landowners, Landowners and Managers Acquisition Internal Technical Assistance Protections off of ANF for telephus spurge include: RGP and North Glades on PCB (St Joe easements) and Shallow Reed Site conservation easement in Gulf County. Other lands that at least one of these 4 include Tates Hell SF, Lathrop Island (BLM and St Joe private), Brenda Ward private landowners has a few skullcaps, St Joe Buffer Preserve has skullcap, spurge, butterwort. Actual costs of acquiring land by purchase or protecting it through conservation easements is NOT included here. This is an ongoing action. To date, about nine protected P. ionantha populations have been secured: one population on the St. Joseph Buffer Preserve (SJBP), Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou, Bay County; one population (but potentially extirpated) at Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA), Franklin County; and seven populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest, Franklin County. 10 protected populations of M. alba have been secured: two populations on the St. Joseph Buffer Preserve (SJBP), Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou, Bay County; one population at Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA), Franklin County; and six populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest, Franklin County. For S. floridana, 7 protected populations have been secured: three populations on the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve (SJBSBP), Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou, Bay County; and three populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest (THSF), Franklin County. These are public lands and therefore, protected under the Endangered Species Act. To date, six protected populations have been secured for telephus spurge: four populations on the St. Joseph Buffer Preserve (Gulf County), and the North Glades and the Breakfast Point Mitigation Bank (BPMB) populations (Bay County).
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 2 3.2 Develop management plans for protected sites outside AN Ongoing Current FY 2005 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Private landowners, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, including Forestry Division, Contractor, Landowners and Managers Management: Planning Contract Some of the public and private lands contain mgt plans per either their requirements as public lands or within easements, or result of consultation requirement. Management plans for P. ionantha have been developed and implemented by the: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC) for the Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA) (FWCC 2006); Bureau of Land Management (BLM) & the St. Joe Timberland Company (Timberland Company) for the Lathrop Bayou (BLM 2008). For M. alba, management plans have been developed and implemented by the: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC) for the Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA) (FWCC 2006); Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the St. Joe Timberland Company (Timberland Company) for the Lathrop Bayou (BLM 2003). For S. floridana, management plans have been developed and implemented by the: 1) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the St. Joe Timberland Company (Timberland Company) for the Lathrop Bayou (BLM 2003), and 2) Florida Department of Environmental Protection for the SJBSBP. Recently, the Plant Conservation Program of the Florida Division of Forestry provided management recommendations, i.e., application of prescribed fire, to assist THSF land managers in prioritizing stands that contain federally threatened plant species
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 2 3.3 Implement management and monitoring for protected sites outside ANF Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Private landowners, Universities, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, including Forestry Division, Landowners and Managers Management: General Labor type not yet selected Regular mgt occurs on Tates Hell, St Joe Buffer Preserve, St Joe lands in RGP, Brenda Wards property. No formal monitoring plans are in place that we are aware. FY 2011-12: Pinguicula ionantha – though this species seems to be quite stable at Tate’s Hell SF, we had major losses of individuals at the Lower New River sites.  It is unknown why over 50 plants were not there upon recent survey. Scuttelaria floridana – Could not find one population after recent burn but found 20-30 more nearby.  This plant is not reacting well to fires and we lost half of the population at one site in Tate’s Hell SF.
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 3 2.1 Develop a regional report on right-of-way management in coastal savannah regions Not Started Other U.S. Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, Florida Department of Transportation, Contractor Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Contract
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 3 2.2 Experiment with right-of-way management Not Started U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, Florida Department of Transportation, Utilities, Florida County Road Department Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Internal Field Assistance
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 3 4.1 Macbridea genetic study Complete FY 2000 - FY 2004 FY 2000 - FY 2004 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Universities Research: Genetics Graduate Student 10 populations with an average sample size of 47 plants were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Of the 22 loci analyzed, 11 were polymorphic. Compared to other mints, M. alba is genetically depauperate.
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 White birds-in-a-nest Macbridea alba 3 5 Garden propagation and reintroduction Ongoing Current FY 2006 FY 2008 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Botanical Gardens, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Center for Plant Conservation Research: Propagation Labor type not yet selected Ping is sold on open market. Contract with Historic Bok Tower initiated FY 06 for ex situ research and protection on spurge, skullcap, and butterwort. Birds in a nest already held in ex situ by HBok Sanctuary. Tested transplant occur with minimization measures on St Joe lands into conservation easement area with minimal success to date (drought in spring fy 2006 may be reason not more successful). Although conserving M. alba in-situ is the best option, an ex-situ collection of established seedlings and adults is recommended. Dr. Brenda Molano-Flores (Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL) and collaborators will be investigating seed germination requirements. Telephus Spurge: Seed germination and plant transplantation experiments are currently being conducted at Historic Bok Sanctuary (Sanctuary), Lake Wales, Florida. Seeds were collected from Bay and Gulf Counties and germination experiments have been initiated by the Sanctuary. One hundred and sixty-five plants were collected in 2005 from private property owned by St. Joe Company (North Glades), which was planned for development and contained thousands of E. telephioides (Peterson and Campbell 2007). Only 1.2 % survived after 23 months. In May 2007, Peterson and Campbell (2007) collected 283 plants from downtown Port St. Joe (the future site of the Gulf County Hospital Campus). The plants and seedlings will be monitored for five years at the Sanctuary. In general, Peterson and Campbell (2007) concluded that this species is difficult to propagate and maintain. From the same private land (North Glades) owned by St. Joe Company, 1,000 plant rhizomes were transplanted to BPMB in 2004. More than half of the transplanted plants re-sprouted in 2005, but only 15.4% survived the 2006 drought (Ecological Resource Consultants 2006). 2015: Botanist from the Panama City Field Office and staff from the Tyndall Air Force Base rescued 238 plants and relocated them to a wet prairie at Tyndall AFB where a population of Godfrey’s Butterwort exists and can be used as reference population. Plants were planted in groups of 22-25 plants, forming eight subpopulations. A monitoring plan has been developed to learn about post-transplanting survival, growth, and reproduction