Recovery Plan Ad Hoc Report results

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Plan Title Plan Stage Plan Lead Region (FWS) Plan Lead Office (FWS) Species Common Name Species Scientific Name Action Priority Action Number Action Description Action Status Estimated Initiation Date Estimated Completion Date Action Lead Agencies Responsible Parties Work Types Labor Types Comments Implementation Activity Number Implementation Activity Description Implementation Activity Status Implementation Activity Estimated Initiation Date Implementation Activity Estimated Completion Date Implementation Activity Labor Types Implementation Activity Work Types Implementation Activity Responsible Parties Implementation Activity Comments Implementation Activity Species
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 1 1.22 Scutellaria floridana population biology in ANF Ongoing Not Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service Research: Habitat Requirements, Research: Propagation, Research: Other Information, Research: Genetics Species Expert genetics: The study shows good information on this plant, but caution is recommended because the study was based on a small sample size. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) on 192 samples from 7 populations indicated high levels of genetic diversity for most populations of S. floridana; the sampled populations did not show signs of inbreeding depression (Molano et al. 2015). These populations are genetically similar according to Nei’s genetic distance, with high levels of polymorphism and heterozygosity, and without population structure associated with geography. Therefore, the sampled populations of S. floridana may have good levels of variation to help buffer against stochastic events. Also, the lack of population structure indicates that various combinations of populations could be used for seed collection and reintroduction efforts. Pitts-Singer, Hanula, & Walker (2002) study on pollinators indicated that Megachilidae and Halictidae were the visitors the flowers. Dr. Brenda Molano-Flores (Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL) and collaborators are investigating seed germination and population genetics; is a two year project 2011-2012. Results: Seed bank - Soil samples were collected from 5 sites. No seedlings of Scuttelaria floridana emerged. Seed germination - In 2012 only four of the 8 sites that were visited had individuals blooming, but only one site had enough capsules to collect. Seeds were collected, but did not germinate. To test different germination treatments, three other Scuttelaria spp were tested and a seed germination treatment has been identified. To evaluate the success of the treatment we are testing Scuttelaria floridana seeds provided by Bok Tower Gardens. Bok Tower Gardens seeds have been tested for viability. These seeds were found to have 40% viability.
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 2 1.1 Management/monitoring in Apalachicola National Forest (AN) Ongoing Current FY 1995 - FY 1999 Other U.S. Forest Service Management: General Internal Field Assistance Management is an ongoing action conducted by the U.S. Forest Service. The ANF has a yearly goal of completing 100,000 acres of prescribed burning program (A. Edwards, USFS, 6/12/2019; J. Dunlap, USFS, 10/30/2017, pers. comm.). From 2012 to 2018, the USFS burned annually on average 83,744 acres, with an average of 32,431of those acres being in the growing season (J. Anderson, USFS, 6/12/2019, calculated from the Forest Service Tracking System). USFS will continue to apply prescribed fire (dormant and growing season), in addition to include rare plant locations on their prescribed fire maps for both protection and to prioritize habitat areas for hand lighting prescribed fire (J. Drake, USFS, 07/24/2019). Macbridea alba is found scattered under the Apalachicola National Forest Utility ROW of SR 65. Protective measures have been established with Talquin Electric during annual maintenance and the upcoming pole replacement. 2019 Scutellaria floridana: - 1) The Service (collaborative with A. Johnson, FNAI) established in 2017 a total of fifteen randomly selected 1 x 1 m quadrats within three sites at the ANF, Florida, representing two treatments (savanna and intermediate) and the control. Vegetative growth, flowering and survival of shoots are currently monitored three times a year to provide baseline data to relate survival of these ramets to the effect of thinning (pre- and post- timber harvest) and prescribed and wild fires. 2) Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) under contract to the USFS established in 2017 nineteen Carolina Vegetation Survey (CVS) monitoring plots to quantify forest structure and species composition before and after restoration efforts. S. floridana stems were counted within 20 subplots inside the CVS plot to evaluate known patches before and after restoration efforts to quantify population changes as a result of the restoration (A. Jenkins, FNAI, 06/12/2019). USFS will continue to revisit the monitoring plots after management activities have occurred as well as to survey in proposed timber sale areas (J. Drake, USFS, 07/24/2019). 3) Also under its contract with the USFS, the Florida Natural Areas Inventory monitors 7 permanently marked plots on the ANF after every prescribed fire event. At these plots flowering stems are counted. Vegetative stems have been counted at the same time as flowering stems at one monitoring date in 3 of the plots. Habitat data (forest structure and composition) was collected in these plots when they were established. 2012 Pinguicula ionantha: site # 106 = < 30 individuals (visual estimate) ANF - Field Branch = 115 individuals site # 126 = 105 individuals 2015: Beasley Pond consultation ANForest: a large populationof about 2000 plants was found in compartment 27- at present working with the FS to protect this large population
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 2 3.1 Secure protection for the 4 plants outside AN Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Private landowners, Landowners and Managers Acquisition Internal Technical Assistance Protections off of ANF for telephus spurge include: RGP and North Glades on PCB (St Joe easements) and Shallow Reed Site conservation easement in Gulf County. Other lands that at least one of these 4 include Tates Hell SF, Lathrop Island (BLM and St Joe private), Brenda Ward private landowners has a few skullcaps, St Joe Buffer Preserve has skullcap, spurge, butterwort. Actual costs of acquiring land by purchase or protecting it through conservation easements is NOT included here. This is an ongoing action. To date, about nine protected P. ionantha populations have been secured: one population on the St. Joseph Buffer Preserve (SJBP), Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou, Bay County; one population (but potentially extirpated) at Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA), Franklin County; and seven populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest, Franklin County. 10 protected populations of M. alba have been secured: two populations on the St. Joseph Buffer Preserve (SJBP), Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou, Bay County; one population at Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA), Franklin County; and six populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest, Franklin County. For S. floridana, 7 protected populations have been secured: three populations on the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve (SJBSBP), Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou, Bay County; and three populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest (THSF), Franklin County. These are public lands and therefore, protected under the Endangered Species Act. To date, 10 protected populations have been secured: SJSBP (Gulf County); North Glades, Breakfast Point Mitigation Bank (BPMB) and Tyndall AFB (Bay County); the Box-R WMA and the Carrabelle-Eastpoint transmission corridor populations (Franklin County). No land acquisition has been completed. S. floridana: About 8 protected populations have been secured to date: three populations on the SJBSBP, Gulf County; one population at Lathrop Bayou (LB), Bay County; three populations at Tate?s Hell State Forest (THSF) and one at Box-R Management Area (Box-R), Franklin County. These are public lands; monitoring has not been initiated. No land acquisition has been accomplished for specific protection of S. floridana.
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 2 3.2 Develop management plans for protected sites outside AN Ongoing Current FY 2005 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Private landowners, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, including Forestry Division, Contractor, Landowners and Managers Management: Planning Contract Some of the public and private lands contain mgt plans per either their requirements as public lands or within easements, or result of consultation requirement. Management plans for P. ionantha have been developed and implemented by the: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC) for the Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA) (FWCC 2006); Bureau of Land Management (BLM) & the St. Joe Timberland Company (Timberland Company) for the Lathrop Bayou (BLM 2008). For M. alba, management plans have been developed and implemented by the: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC) for the Box-R Wildlife Management Area (Box-R WMA) (FWCC 2006); Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the St. Joe Timberland Company (Timberland Company) for the Lathrop Bayou (BLM 2003). For S. floridana, management plans have been developed and implemented by the: 1) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the St. Joe Timberland Company (Timberland Company) for the Lathrop Bayou (BLM 2003), and 2) Florida Department of Environmental Protection for the SJBSBP. Recently, the Plant Conservation Program of the Florida Division of Forestry provided management recommendations, i.e., application of prescribed fire, to assist THSF land managers in prioritizing stands that contain federally threatened plant species. Euphorbia telephioides: Management and collection of baseline data of three protected locations were conducted in 2004 and 2006 populations at North Glades and BPMB, and transplant population at BPMB. Mowing is the only management strategy at North Glades due to close proximity to highway and residential areas. Baseline data for three protected sites (BPMB, SJBP, and Box-R WMA) was gathered and assessed by Negrón-Ortiz & Kaeser (2020). Data determined the response of telephus spurge to prescribed fire (Negrón-Ortiz & Kaeser 2020). Prescribed fire is the controlled management for populations on the SJSBP (Gulf Co.), BPMB, and the Box-R WMA.
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 2 3.3 Implement management and monitoring for protected sites outside ANF Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Private landowners, Universities, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, including Forestry Division, Landowners and Managers Management: General Labor type not yet selected 2019: Illinois Natural History Survey - University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign is studying existing and potential sites for populations of Macbridea alba within St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve, Tate's Hell State Forest, and the Apalachicola National Forest. The investigators are visiting documented sites and suitable new haitat. Regular mgt occurs on Tates Hell, St Joe Buffer Preserve, St Joe lands in RGP, Brenda Wards property. No formal monitoring plans are in place that we are aware. FY 2011-12: Pinguicula ionantha – though this species seems to be quite stable at Tate’s Hell SF, we had major losses of individuals at the Lower New River sites.  It is unknown why over 50 plants were not there upon recent survey. Scuttelaria floridana – Could not find one population after recent burn but found 20-30 more nearby.  This plant is not reacting well to fires and we lost half of the population at one site in Tate’s Hell SF.
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 3 1.22 Population biology- genetic studies Partially Complete FY 2012 FY 2014 Other Botanical Gardens, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Universities Management: Planning, Research: Genetics Graduate Student, Contract Scutellaria floridana: Population genetic studies is currently carrying out by a Master students from Miami Univ- The aims of the population genetic studies are to determine: 1) genetic diversity within and among populations and 2) population genetic similarity. The results of these studies will inform seed collection and reintroduction efforts. The identification of populations with rare alleles or with high levels of genetic diversity will be a focus of these studies, as this will be important for the preservation of these species. Pinguicula ionantha: Dr. Brenda Molano-Flores (rare plant conservation) Illinois Natural History Survey, 1816 South Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820. molano@inhs.uiuc.edu; Dr. Janice Coons (seed ecology) Eastern Illinois University, Biological Sciences Department, Life Sciences Bldg. 2070, 600 Lincoln Ave., Charleston, IL 61920. jcoons@eiu.edu Dr. Jason Koontz (population genetics) Augustana College, Biology Department, Science Building 315, 639 38th Street, Rock Island, IL 61201. JasonKoontz@augustana.edu. Results: AFLPs indicated a moderate amount of gene flow among populations of P. ionantha, and a somewhat higher rate of gene flow among populations of S. floridana. Scutellaria floridana populations appear to have higher levels of genetic diversity in terms of polymorphism and heterozygosity than P. ionantha. In addition, S. floridana populations are less structured genetically (FST = 0.0349) than P. ionantha populations (FST = 0.1384) and their genetic distance values are generally lower. The results of the seed germination studies for P. ionantha showed that the giberellic acid treatment resulted in the highest germination percentage (63%). In addition, differences were found among populations of P. ionantha for percent seed germination. In the case of Scutellaria floridana, the highest germination percentage resulted for the control (i.e., no treatment; 33%). A persistent seed bank was not detected for either species. Euphorbia telephioides: Trapnell et al. (2012) studied the genetic composition of E. telephioides. Twentythree allozyme loci were resolved for 17 populations. Species-wide genetic diversity was high, ranking E. telephioides among the highest 10% of plant species surveyed. However, genetic differentiation among populations is lower than that observed for other herbaceous outcrossing perennial plant species. The eleven populations in Gulf County are more different from one another than populations within Franklin or Bay Counties, so they may represent older, more stable populations. Data suggest that high rates of gene flow have historically occurred between populations because they were probably more continuously distributed in Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties; therefore, their relative contemporary isolation is probably recent. Estimates of population growth rates from stage-structured demographic models by Ms.Natali Ramirez-Bullon, a graduate student from FL State University - Ongoing; In-situ germination studies, completed, for details see Negrón-Ortiz & Kaeser (2020); Phenological data (timing, duration and abundance of recurrent biological processes, including reproductive events such as flowering, fruiting, seed germination) have emerged as useful tools for studying the impact of climate change on plants, completed, for details see Negrón-Ortiz & Kaeser (2020).
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 3 2.1 Develop a regional report on right-of-way management in coastal savannah regions Not Started Other U.S. Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, Florida Department of Transportation, Contractor Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Contract
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 3 2.2 Experiment with right-of-way management Not Started U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, Florida Department of Transportation, Utilities, Florida County Road Department Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Internal Field Assistance
Apalachicola Plants (4 spp.) F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida skullcap Scutellaria floridana 3 5 Garden propagation and reintroduction Ongoing Current FY 2006 FY 2026 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Botanical Gardens, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Center for Plant Conservation Research: Propagation Labor type not yet selected 2019: Overall, S. floridana lacks a seed bank; in-situ seeds do not require specific germination treatments; stem cuttings and rhizomes are not optimal propagation techniques; and seeds can maintain viability under controlled conditions Ping is sold on open market. Contract with Historic Bok Tower initiated FY 06 for ex situ research and protection on spurge, skullcap, and butterwort. Birds in a nest already held in ex situ by HBok Sanctuary. Tested transplant occur with minimization measures on St Joe lands into conservation easement area with minimal success to date (drought in spring fy 2006 may be reason not more successful). Although conserving M. alba in-situ is the best option, an ex-situ collection of established seedlings and adults is recommended. An ex-situ plan will be developed in collaboration with the ABG and other Agencies. Reintroduction has not been initiated, but if necessary, results from the habitat suitability model by Johnson and Molano-Flores using Maxent may inform this process. The model alluded a few potential reintroduction sites at Bald Point State Park, St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, THSF, SJBSBP, and the ARWEA. Dr. Brenda Molano-Flores (Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL) and collaborators will be investigating seed germination requirements. Telephus Spurge: Seed germination and plant transplantation experiments are currently being conducted at Historic Bok Sanctuary (Sanctuary), Lake Wales, Florida. Seeds were collected from Bay and Gulf Counties and germination experiments have been initiated by the Sanctuary. One hundred and sixty-five plants were collected in 2005 from private property owned by St. Joe Company (North Glades), which was planned for development and contained thousands of E. telephioides (Peterson and Campbell 2007). Only 1.2 % survived after 23 months. In May 2007, Peterson and Campbell (2007) collected 283 plants from downtown Port St. Joe (the future site of the Gulf County Hospital Campus). The plants and seedlings will be monitored for five years at the Sanctuary. In general, Peterson and Campbell (2007) concluded that this species is difficult to propagate and maintain. From the same private land (North Glades) owned by St. Joe Company, 1,000 plant rhizomes were transplanted to BPMB in 2004. More than half of the transplanted plants re-sprouted in 2005, but only 15.4% survived the 2006 drought (Ecological Resource Consultants 2006). 2015: Botanist from the Panama City Field Office and staff from the Tyndall Air Force Base rescued 238 plants and relocated them to a wet prairie at Tyndall AFB where a population of Godfrey?s Butterwort exists and can be used as reference population. Plants were planted in groups of 22-25 plants, forming eight subpopulations. A monitoring plan has been developed to learn about post-transplanting survival, growth, and reproduction