Recovery Plan Ad Hoc Report results

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Plan Title Plan Stage Plan Lead Region (FWS) Plan Lead Office (FWS) Species Common Name Species Scientific Name Action Priority Action Number Action Description Action Status Estimated Initiation Date Estimated Completion Date Action Lead Agencies Responsible Parties Work Types Labor Types Comments Implementation Activity Number Implementation Activity Description Implementation Activity Status Implementation Activity Estimated Initiation Date Implementation Activity Estimated Completion Date Implementation Activity Labor Types Implementation Activity Work Types Implementation Activity Responsible Parties Implementation Activity Comments Implementation Activity Species
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 1 1 Encourage conservation of existing populations on private lands Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other Landowners , Manager Management, Management: Habitat Maintenance and Manipulation Species Expert TNC is manging population on their land. TNC is also participating in an informal working group that with the Service, makes receomendations to FDEP who has approx. 95% of all historic and current occurences on their land.
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 1 2 Annual population monitoring and mapping Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks Research: Population Surveys Internal Field Assistance FDEP is conducting surveys of their land to map all occurences of the plant.They are also conducting monitoring of the plant's response to their habitat restoration activites. 2015:Treatments were identified to compare windrow removal, sand pine removal, mechanical treatment, wiregrass plantings and burn interval; ongoing task. This is an ongoing action conducted by FNAI and Florida Park Service staff and volunteers in recent years. Currently, 60 - 70 % of the Sweetwater Creek Track (SCT) containing C. glabra has been mapped (Spector, 2009, pers. comm.). 2015 FL State Park: The current range of Conradina is currently being updated, along with total population numbers.
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 1 3 Management of rights-of-way Partially Complete FY 2006 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Florida Department of Transportation, Utilities, County Road Department Management: Land Use Labor type not yet selected Florida Gas Transmsssion company as apart of a Section 7 consultation for management and maintanance of their ROW have transplanted plants that would be otherwise destroyed by maintenace activties, to FDEP land to aid in recovery efforts. FGT has also agreed to protect the plant during ROW maintanance activities. This recovery action is ongoing and conducted primarily by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and Florida Gas and Transmission (FGT). Spot application of moderately toxic herbicide Garlon 4 is used to treat exotic shrubs or trees at Torreya State Park (TSP).
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 1 4 Habitat acquisition Partially Complete FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, including Forestry Division Acquisition: Fee Title Labor type not yet selected In 2001 FDEP acquired 7,040 acres of the "Sweetwater Tract. The purchase encommapsses the majority (90-95%) of the plants known and hisoric range.Actual costs of acquiring land by purchase or protecting it through conservation easements is not included here
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 1 5 Population biology - fire management Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks Research: Management Techniques Labor type not yet selected Both TNC and FDEP are monitoring the plants response to their prescribed burning programs.More monitoring and research is needed as FDEP begings to introduce fire on their land on more of a landscape scale that will impact lagrger segments of populations of c. glabra. This is an ongoing action initiated in 2005 and conducted by the Florida Park Service. The response in ground and canopy cover, and overall C. glabra density and individuals under 5mm height are being monitored for five years following four treatments: 1) mechanical sand pine removal with windrow intact, burn and native plants not planted, 2) mechanical sand pine removal and flatten windrows, burn and native plants not planted, 3) mechanical sand pine removal, native groundcover planted and burn in flattened windrows, and 4) control/no harvest (Spector, 2009, pers. comm.). The results indicated that each treatment had a positive effect on C. glabra abundance with higher overall abundance in the level treatments (flattened windrows). Vegetative recruitment via re-sprouting of broken stems or roots (ramets) likely account for the increase of C. glabra in flattened windrows (treatments 3 & 4). Recruitment from seeds was not observed, although it was suggested that C. glabra might be an episodic recruiter. Abundance declined in the control plots (Spector and Bente 2014).
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 2 6 Population biology - life history studies Partially Complete Prior to FY 1995 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, Universities Research: Population Assessment, Management: Planning Species Expert Fl. Dept. of Agricultural & Consumer Services, Division of Forestry completed a pollineation study, documenting poliination between 3 differnt populations on TNC land is taking pl ace. Currently (2009): Ms. Amanda Kubes, a Florida State University graduate student, is examining the effectiveness of pollinators on seed set, information that she plans to use in projecting species distribution models of potential range shifts under future climate change (Note: how effectiveness will be used in projecting distribution need clarification). Mr. J. Bladow and Dr. Winn (Florida State University) censused in 2009 and 2010 three introduced populations and three natural populations to construct stage-structured demographic models to project the current growth rates of the introduced populations and to compare them to natural populations. Sensitivity and elasticity analyses were performed to determine the importance of individual rates of growth, survival, and seed production to the overall success of each population. All of the populations examined were projected to grow or remain stable indicating that the introduced and natural populations are projected to be successful. As a whole, introduced populations grew faster than natural populations. Stasis of large plants, or the proportion of large plants that survived and remained in the same stage class from one year to the next, was the most important vital rate in maintaining the population growth rate for both introduced and natural populations. At present, all populations are projected to remain stable or grow, although the timeframe over which data were collected was short relative to the lifetime of individuals, and the predicted success of populations is conditional upon the assumption that estimates of the vital rates accurately reflect long-term rates of growth, survival, and reproduction. Inbreeding depression can occur in these populations and is a threat that should be considered when introducing populations, even though at this time, C. glabra populations are growing despite the potential for inbreeding depression. Seed viability and germination studies: On June 2016 about 1,881 fruits were collected from three SCT areas (treatment mowed, and non-mowed; control), dissected in the lab, and 2,701 seeds counted. Based on morphology, only 25 % were considered viable. These 676 seeds were placed in 75 germination bags (1-15 seeds/bag), tagged, and bags monitored. No germination was observed after nine months of burial. Other observations have reported low germination potential for seeds collected in 2011 and 2012 (< 10% viability; Spector and Bente 2009) and circumstantial seed germination evidence during gardening (D. Printis, TNC 2017, pers. comm.). Further studies involving soil seed bank, seed viability, germination and seedling recruitment are necessary.
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 3 7 Conradina glabra surveys outside its current range Not Started Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 3 8 Genetic studies Complete Prior to FY 1995 Prior to FY 1995 Other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Universities Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Martin (1992) used starch gel electrophoresis to describe allozyme diversity and genetic structure in this endangered species and its nearest relative, C. canescens. The author sampled two disjunct populations: one population containing three subpopulations of C. glabra in Liberty County and two C. canescens populations located in Santa Rosa County. The results revealed that each of the two disjunct populations was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and had high levels of genetic diversity typical of an outcrossing breeding system (see section II.3 recovery action 2.2). The allozyme study showed that the C. glabra populations are genetically divergent from the populations of C. canescens. A recent study employing microsatellite data indicated that the species boundaries are not questionable (Edwards 2008a). DNA barcoding: An ongoing project on barcoding Florida’s rare plant species has included the specimens of C. glabra from the Bok Sanctuary (C. Peterson, 2017 pers. comm.). Three barcoding gene sequences will be uploaded to the BLASTN NIH database when this work is complete.
Apalachicola Rosemary F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Apalachicola rosemary Conradina glabra 3 9 Garden propagation and reintroduction Partially Complete FY 2006 Other Botanical Gardens, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Center for Plant Conservation Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Florida Gas Transmission Co. has translplnted plants from their ROW that would have otherwise been destroyed during their mainteance activites to FDEP lands to aid in recovery efforts. At present, the Bok Sanctuary has three beds of this species along with two that contain sparse plantings totaling 93 plants. These plants are clones of the same source population made in November of 1987 and 1988 (Campbell, 2009, pers. comm.). Neither the Bok Sanctuary nor the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, Co. possesses stored seeds. Translocation Conradina glabra was reintroduced within its original range onto The Nature Conservancy's ABRP in 1991. Forty-eight plots of nine rooted cuttings were planted in each of three xeric sandhill sites at the preserve. Survival of planted cuttings was 94%. Prescribed fire management applied to two of the sites killed 25 % of those plants. Seedling establishment was highest in the burned sites. In general, survival rate was high 1 or 2 years after transplantation, however, long-term results of these transplants are lacking (D. Printis, TNC, 2009, pers. comm.). Using demographic models, Bladow et al. (2017) analyzed the reintroduced populations, and determined that these populations were projected to grow or remain stable. The analyses indicated that reintroduction is a successful conservation tool for C. glabra (Bladow et al. 2017). Longer term monitoring is necessary, because although initial transplant survival rates may be high the results of translocation are often followed by significant reversals over time.