Recovery Plan Ad Hoc Report results

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Plan Title Plan Stage Plan Lead Region (FWS) Plan Lead Office (FWS) Species Common Name Species Scientific Name Action Priority Action Number Action Description Action Status Estimated Initiation Date Estimated Completion Date Action Lead Agencies Responsible Parties Work Types Labor Types Comments Implementation Activity Number Implementation Activity Description Implementation Activity Status Implementation Activity Estimated Initiation Date Implementation Activity Estimated Completion Date Implementation Activity Labor Types Implementation Activity Work Types Implementation Activity Responsible Parties Implementation Activity Comments Implementation Activity Species
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 11 Manage existing biological preserves Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, City of Chattahoochee, FL Management: General Internal Field Assistance Management plans have been developed and implemented by TSP. Management includes constructing enclosures to prevent damage from deer, restoring adjacent uplands, preventing erosion in the sandhill and slope forests, and exotic species control. The Corps has no written management plan and we do not have information for the TNC population.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 111 Protect habitat from activities within preserves Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, City of Chattahoochee, FL Management: General Internal Field Assistance
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 112 Protect habitat from activities outside preserves Ongoing Not Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, City of Chattahoochee, FL Management: Other Internal Field Assistance Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) and TNC have provided management receomendations to the City of Chatahoochee and also have conducted some invasive species plant contol on City owned land Management is an ongoing action conducted by TNC, Torreya State Park (TSP), and the Corps. Ms. Pamela Anderson (volunteer) has mulched plants at the Gregory House (TSP). She is monitoring 400+ trees and has gone back several times to each plant collecting data related to stem length and width. According to her results, she has noticed an apparent decline since 2000. Management plans have been developed and implemented by TSP. Management includes constructing enclosures to prevent damage from deer, restoring adjacent uplands, preventing erosion in the sandhill and slope forests, and exotic species control. The Corps has no written management plan and we do not have information for the TNC population.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 12 Determine protection strategies for habitat outside preserves Ongoing Current Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Management: General Volunteer, Internal Technical Assistance Mr. Bill Boothe (FL private landowner) has a property with Torreya and has identified GPS locations for over 100 trees. His observations included other nearby properties comprised of about 40-50 trees of 6-15 feet tall. He would like to use private lands as experimental plots ¿ opening up the canopy, using smoke for pest control to limit die off. In general, Ms Anderson and Mr. Boothe are going to try to fence the trees to prevent against deer rubbing, and will continue to record measurements for the trees. They are willing to form the Torreya Conservation Commission at Crooked Creek, FL (see section IV, action 6).
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 121 Implement protection measures Ongoing Current FY 2011 FY 2012 Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, Individuals/Landowners Management: Population Monitoring Species Expert Installation of protective deer fencing around 50 of the remaining Torreya trees in the wild (bringing the total number caged trees to 100 or > 10% of the trees thought to be existing in the wild) was conducted by the Atlanta Botanical Garden and Florida Park Service. A Cooperative Agreement was being implemented to address this action. 2015 Florida State Parks: ~25% of the known Torreya trees at the park are caged to prevent deer rub. Will recheck caged trees and a representative sample of uncaged trees to assess tree condition yearly.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 21 Identify pathogen(s) responsible for the decline Ongoing Current FY 2009 Other Universities, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division o Plant Industry, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Research Species Expert, Contract This is an ongoing action that goes back to 1967. At present, Dr. Lydia Rivera (Univ. of Puerto Rico, 2009) is conducting a soil-borne pathogen survey, emphasizing the detection of Phytophthora spp. She isolated 102 fungi from TSP, FL, and Corps property, GA. Of the trees surveyed, 48 % had root necrosis and stem cankers. Dr. Rivera found 21 genera of fungi and water molds associated with roots of diseased Torreya. Of these genera, eight were known plant pathogens, while the remainders were lignin and cellulose decomposers and saprophytes. Further research is needed to distinguish the pathogens that are causing decline from those opportunistically responding to the weakened condition of affected trees. She is designing a pathogenicity test associated with potential disease outbreaks. Dr. Jason Smith (Univ. of Florida) is conducting an above-ground plant pathogen study. He isolated numerous fungi from cankers and consistently found an undescribed Fusarium sp.; he is working with a specialist in Japan to describe the new Fusarium species. He proposes to elucidate the disease biology, as well as conductive epidemiological factors and treatment. Aaron Trulock is a graduate student under Smith and will be doing his research on the biology of canker disease of the T. taxifolia.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 331 Establish program to obtain cuttings Ongoing Current Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Management: Propagation, Management: Population Monitoring Species Expert 2015 FL State Park: Expand surveys into TNC property, to increase understanding of current range and collect additional cuttings for safeguarding of the species.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 332 Establish cuttings Ongoing Current Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected As part of the Center for Plant Conservation program, 2,622 stem cuttings were collected from 166 trees at 14 sites in the late 1980s to the early 90s. Rooted cuttings were sent to 10 institutions (including the Bok Tower Garden, Lake Wales, Florida) for safeguarding but this material posed several challenges: could carry unknown pathogens responsible for the decline of this species; and the cuttings were mainly collected from lateral branches and in cultivation they often display plageotropic architecture (they have dominant lateral growth and end up looking like shrubs). The ABG has switched to propagating cuttings made from ¿leaders¿- the rapidly growing apex (top) of a tree. This process forms upright plants of about two-feet tall in about two years. The Bok Tower Garden (BTG) received 97 plants from Arnold Arboretum on 1991. BTG staff actively propagated clones and annually reported growth and mortality data to Mercer Arboretum, Arnold Arboretum and to the Center for Population Biology. At present, BTG has 15 plants located on the Garden grounds as permanent plantings. The ABG has been propagating T. taxifolia in its conservation collection for more than 20 years and has increased the number of trees in its collection to more than 1200 stems. This is the largest ex-situ collection of Florida Torreya outside the natural range of the species (and potentially as large as the remaining wild population). After more than 20 years since the ex situ collections were established at ABG, they have the first reproductive offspring. 2012: The efforts to date have resulted in 67 new cuttings added to the safeguarding collection in cultivation at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. The cuttings are currently being rooted on the mist bench in the greenhouse at the Garden. 2013: 82 new cuttings added to the safeguarding collection in cultivation at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. The cuttings are currently being rooted on the mist bench in the greenhouse at the Garden. Activities during this project period have resulted in propagation of cuttings from wild genotypes for safeguarding and eventual seedling production in cultivation. The Atlanta Botanical Garden conservation nursery in Gainesville, GA now holds 125 Torreya trees that originated from wild material. This material is documented and indexed in the accession records of the Garden. The material serves as a safeguarding population for the wild populations. The greenhouses at the Atlanta Botanical Garden now hold 244 accessioned Torreya taxifolia trees. This material originated from cuttings of wild material it is documented and indexed as part of the ex situ conservation collection. The plants will propagated and grown as safeguarding material.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 1 5 Establish experim. Collections outside native habitat Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Georgia: The ABG and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources outplanted 19 individuals of T. taxifolia at the Smithgall Woods in White County in north Georgia. The purpose of the Smithgall Woods collection and two additional off-site plantings (Blairesville, GA and Vogel State Park) were to establish safeguarding populations of Torreya to conserve material that had been propagated at the ABG in backup collections at more than one location. The material planted at Smithgall Woods was propagated from all Georgia source population material (Army Corps. Of Engineers, site at Woodruff Dam, Lake Seminole, in Georgia). The trees have grown quite large and are now reproductively mature producing male and female cones annually. Most of the plants were placed in full sun and they are quiet healthy. The trees at Vogel State park are smaller than those at Smithgall Woods and have not yet reached reproductive maturity. North Carolina: In 1939 nearly a dozen specimens of T. taxifolia were planted at the Biltmore Gardens; 31 seedlings were planted in 2008 at two locations near Waynesville; and 10 seedlings were planted at Bt. Highlands and Franklin (http://www.torreyaguardians.org/north-carolina.html).
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 22 Experiments in disease management in mature cultivated specimens Unknown Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected As of this update status of this task is unknown althogh there has been some work conducted in this area.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 221 Conduct tests of culture regimens Ongoing Current Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Research: Propagation Species Expert J. Smith (Univ. of Florida) and collaborators will be conducting independent fungicides tests for stem canker; they might also use lime, varying pH on clonally propagated material. The Atlanta Botanical Garden is collaborating with Dr. Jerry Pullman of Georgia Institute of Technology to develop techniques for producing clonal lines of T. taxifolia through embryogenesis in tissue culture. Torreya taxifolia somatic embryos were grown from four clones that were initiated from Tree 1991-2211 in 2008. These embryos were, germinated, and the resulting seedlings were sent to Dr. Jason Smith (University of Florida) for use in research studies on disease of T. taxifolia
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 222 Investigate mycorrhizal relations Complete FY 2010 FY 2012 Other U.S. Department of Agriculture, Universities, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Acquisition: Easement Contract Dr. Melissa McCormick (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center) proposed to investigate the type of mycorrhizal association formed by T. taxifolia, identify the fungi forming the association, and quantify the degree of colonization. Dr. Melissa McCormick found no evidence that native Torreya habitats were deficient in species of mycorrhizal fungi. She found that Torreya forms associations primarily with fungi in the genus Glomus, which are known to have a role in protecting host trees against root pathogens. Torreya in native habitats had lower mycorrhizal colonization compared to Torreya planted in both forest and garden locations. This might mean that trees in native locations were less well protected against pathogens than in other locations. Alternatively, it might be that the diseased trees in native habitats are less able to pay the carbon cost of supporting mycorrhizal fungi
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 24 Maintain good sanitation on cultivated trees Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, Individuals/Landowners Management: Disease Control Internal Field Assistance Botantical gardens are implementing this task. However no coordination efforst had been made to determine which gardens are implementing an/or the status of this task. 2015 FL State Park: They are currently looking at 3 treatment groups to compare potential management strategies to improve tree health. All trees are caged. 50% of the trees are wild trees and 50% were outplanted from Atlanta Botanical Gardens: Treatments: 1) Added Mulch, 2) Added Lime, 3) Open canopy to allow eastern light, 4) All
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 3121 Search for seed bearing wild trees Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Management: Population Monitoring Internal Field Assistance FDEP has been conducting surveys on recently acquired land. 2015 Florida State Parks: Attempting to survey all larger trees to determine gender and whether they are reproducing. To date, we have found 2 seedlings in the wild underneath of known female trees.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 3122 Harvest seed from wild trees Not Started Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Task duration: 1-10 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 321 Arrange seed exchange Ongoing Current Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected According to R. Determann (Director Conservation, Atlanta Bot Garden), ABG has 500-600 seeds in some years that they propagate and grow in the conservation collection at the garden, and in some cases disseminate to other botanical gardens, to universities for study, use for outreach (display), and long-term storage. The Biltmore Gardens harvested 300 seeds in 2009 and were distributed to interested parties (http://www.torreyaguardians.org/2009-seeds.html).
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 322 Establish seedling production programs Unknown Other Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected The ABG has the largest collection of seed bearing plants. About 60-65 trees have produced seeds that have been propagated, shared with our conservation or research partners. Jerry Pullman (Georgia Institute of Technology) in collaboration with ABG is working on somatic embryogenesis, important for producing disease-freeseedlings/trees.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 3221 Obtain and grow seed at Maclay Unknown Other Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 32211 Assess results Unknown Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 3222 Initiate other programs Unknown Other Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Task duration: 1-5 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 32221 Enlist institutions Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Management: Propagation Internal Field Assistance Several Botantical gardens have been sucessfully growing this plant including but not limted to, Atlantical Botantical gardesn, Biltmore estate and the Arnold Arboretum sTask duration: 1-5 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 4 Investigate ecological requirement Not Started Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 51 Inventory plantings at botanical gardens Not Started Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 52 Supplement existing plantings Unknown Other Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Various Botantical gardens may be implementing this task. However,no efort has been made to determine
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 53 Establish new plantings Unknown Other Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Task duration: 1-10 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 6 Place seed in long term storage Not Started Other U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 2 7 Reestablish torreya in its native habitat Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other The Nature Conservancy, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Management: Reintroduction Internal Field Assistance In 2002, the ABG in collaboration with Florida State Park Service reintroduced seedlings propagated from seed produced from the cuttings collected by the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University in 1989. The cuttings were obtained from the wild population at TSP. The plants were reintroduced into ravines where T. taxifolia had been extirpated. Sixty seedlings were subjected to four different treatments (fungicide, fertilizer only, fertilizer and lime, and control) for determining the optimum reintroduction techniques for this species. Only 34.5 % survived after one year post planting. No further information is available.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 23 Develop protocol for blight control experiments on seedlings and cuttings Ongoing Current Prior to FY 1995 Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Arnold Arboretum colletected 2,000 cutting from ofver 166 tress at 14 sites. Atlanta Botantical Gardens has also collected seedlings from Torreya State Park and TNC Bluffs and Ravines Perserve. However, they have not published any protocol.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 25 Water, cut back, and/or transplant trees on dry sites Unknown Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 3111 Locate seed bearing cultivated trees Unknown Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, Individuals/Landowners Research: Population Surveys Internal Field Assistance Seed-bearing trees are rare; most of the wild population persists as stump sprouts. Currently, in wild populations there are six plants producing cones. Several botanical gardens have seed-bearing trees (Atlanta Botanical Garden (ABG), GA; Callaway Garden, GA; Biltmore Gardens, NC). Several botanical gardens have seed-bearing trees (Atlanta Botanical Garden (ABG), GA; Callaway Garden, GA; Biltmore Gardens, NC). After 10 years in cultivation as part of the conservation collection at ABG, a large proportion (>60) of the Torreya trees began producing reproductive cones. Seedlings from these mature plants also became reproductive within 10 years. According to R. Determann (Conservation Director, Atlanta Bot Garden), the Callaway Garden has a partial duplicate set of ABG cutting inventory trees that had produced seeds, however, they are in decline.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 3112 Protect seed from frugivores Unknown Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Task duration: 2-10 yrs Most trees do not produce cones in the wild population. In ex situ collections, cones on female seed bearing trees are caged at the Atlanta Bot Garden and at one of the safeguarding locations at Georgia Department of Natural Resources Smithgall Woods/Dukes Creek Conservation Area to protect seeds and facilitate collection for propagation.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 31121 Cover trees Partially Complete Prior to FY 1995 Prior to FY 1995 Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Research: Predation Internal Field Assistance Task duration: 1-10 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 31122 Experiment with rodent repellants Not Started Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Task duration: 1-2 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 3113 Harvest cultivated seed Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Management: Propagation Internal Field Assistance Atalanta Botantical gardens has been implementing. Task duration: 2-10 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 32222 Arrange cooperation among individuals Not Started U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program, Individuals/Landowners Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Task duration: 1-5 yrs
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 34 Conduct grafting experiments Not Started Other USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected The recovery plan suggests grafting [asexual propagation where the tissues (vascular cambium) of one plant are fused with those of another] with T. californica. However, T. californica is exhibiting some issues with cankers caused by pathogens with a different Fusarium species which is killing the cambium.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 41 Study the ecological physiology of torreya Ongoing Not Current Other Universities, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Koehn and Doudrick (1999) investigated diurnal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 fixation. The study indicated that plants recovered from daily periods of high light and temperatures, suggesting that they may tolerate higher light conditions in their native habitat. Tree rings studies somewhat indicated that growth in T. taxifolia is light limited (Schwartz and Herman 1999). Herman and Schwartz (1997) conducted shade and open canopy treatments on TNC Apalachicola Bluffs, TSP, and the Corps property. Mortality was high, and no patterns associated with light were detected when data was pooled across sites.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 42 Evaluate the native habitat Ongoing Current FY 2000 - FY 2004 Other The Nature Conservancy, Universities, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Recreation and Parks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Research: Population Surveys Internal Field Assistance Since 2008, the ABG in collaboration with TSP and University of Florida have conducted an updated survey of habitat conditions and population status with the natural range if T. taxifolia. They have georeferenced and collected information on approximately 150 trees from locations throughout the natural range of T. taxifolia. Future efforts should evaluate the success of habitat management experiments in improving the health of in situ trees. Nov 1, 2010 to Oct 31, 2011: 205 new trees were found. A total of 242 trees were visited, including 41 re-visits of trees that were found and tagged in previous years. Of these trees, 61 were caged to protect them from deer damage. 2012: Of the 292 trees visited, 192 were found and assessed for the first time, 94 were re-visits to trees that had been visited once and 6 were trees that were visited for the third time. The number of trees visited represents a huge proportion, perhaps 20-30%, of the suspected population. These tree visits are important for gathering information regarding the status and health of the population. Average height of trees visited during the grant period was 121.8 cm with a basal diameter of 1.87 cm. Of the trees revisited (plus some data collected outside the grant period) 32.4% showed stem dieback and loss of stem length averaging 52.67 cm. The remaining trees (67.6%) did not lose stems and showed positive growth averaging 12.51 cm per year. Of all the trees visited during the grant period 61.9% showed signs of stem canker, 59.8% showed signs of deer rub. Damage to stems that were rubbed by deer averaged 46.1% of stem circumference. 2013: a total of 380 Torreya trees were surveyed or 60% of the total known documented wild population. The survey work took place primarily at Torreya State Park. Of the 380 trees surveyed, 211 were found and assessed for the first time, 124 were reassessments of trees that had been assessed once before, and 16 were trees that were assessed for a third time, and 30 were included as part of an ecological experiment.
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 43 Describe climate and neighboring vegetation of healthy cultivated trees Unknown Other Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Center for Plant Conservation, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected
Florida Torreya F 4 Panama City Ecological Services Field Office (850) 769-0552 Florida torreya Torreya taxifolia 3 44 Study population dynamics Ongoing Current Other Universities, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, USFWS Regional Office 4 - Atlanta, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Program Work type not yet selected Labor type not yet selected Current status surveys conducted between 2008 ¿ 2010 in collaboration between the ABG, TSP, and the University of Florida have documented the health and size of several trees. All of the plants were stem sprouts and none of the plants had reached reproductive maturity. No seeds or seedlings were found. No demographic studies have been done. 2013: ABG documented two seedlings were during, both were observed at the base of the same female tree, but were observed in separate years. The first was observed in the winter of 2011, but the seedling disappeared a few months later. The second was observed in July of 2012 and was fencing to protect it from damage or browse.